How Many Wine Grape Varieties Exist? James Melendez

I became interested in what composed an often quoted 10,000 number for wine grape varieties.  I was skeptical because that number was way too perfect and way too even for the total number of varieties to actually be correct.  In a previous article, I point out various estimates range from 5,000 to 15,000 for wine grape varieties (including synonyms in one estimate): there is a big variance out there still.

I wanted to peek behind the curtain and see the source data.  The data was in several locations and had not been unified in a format identifying all wine grape cultivars.  And often cited resources is the Vitis International Variety Catalogue (VIVC) which list all grapes of all Vitis species including all crossings.  But the peek behind the curtain did help to whittle down to the approximate and most accurate number but I had to create my own taxonomy of wine grape varieties which includes all Vitis species (vinifera, labrusca, aestivalis etc., and all crossings) to get the answer.   Today if you looked up on VIVC today : Vitis Vinifera Linné  Subsp. Vinifera the output would be 12,893.   Voila it is not the accurate wine grape number because many entries don’t:

  • List any purpose of Vitis vinifera grape 
  • Purpose is other than for vinification
  • Or lists wine grapes that most likely don’t exist like Cabernet Pfeffer (I’ll talk more about that later)

Thought it may seem obvious but grapes can be utilised for the following and I have captured function/capability in my taxonomy per each cultivar if known:

  • Wine grapes
  • Table grapes
  • Raisin grapes
  • Juice (non-alcoholic)
  • Jelly/Jams
  • Rootstock

Additionally, I have started to add clones per each cultivar.  Needless to say it is a taxonomy that is never finished and a very large data set to manage.

I have reviewed VIVC, Native Grapes of Italy (D’Agata), Wine Grapes (Robinson, Harding & Vouillamoz), National Grape Registry (UC Davis) and other sources as well.  I have verified 10,170+ wine grape varieties (two thirds of this is Vitis vinifera)–obviously not all are grown commercially and many are kept in agriculture collections at universities and nurseries worldwide.  There are 31,000+ synonyms or 3.1 synonyms per variety.  A nearly Senate majority 61% (or at least a Senate Majority in the old days) do not have a synonym.

This graph shows that from left is showing (no synonyms) to right the most synonyms per variety. The curve is depicting the highest number of 6k+ varieties with no synonyms to the most Pinot Noir with 334 synonyms (the last data point)

Generally, the older the variety the higher number of synonyms is likely and there probably is no surprise that Pinot Noir as an example is the number one cultivar in terms of total synonyms: 334.  The creation of synonyms talks about success of variety as well as the large distribution and even the name itself in many ways begs for a translation wherever you find Pinot Noir–basically and loosely translated from the French ‘Black Pine Cone’–this can easily translate since this is a description.  In the German are Blauburgunder or Spätburgunder – blue Burgundy or  Spät meaning ‘late’ ripening Burgundy grape to represent Pinot Noir.   Other grape names beg for either a name change or synonyms such as the following grape names: SEYVE VILLARD 10-319, GEILWEILERHOF 69-31A- 7, or DI ROVASENDA 4/5/3–though these are a part of a series of experiments and hence the non-compelling names–obviously if these were to be readied for commercial production a more consumer friendly name would be instituted.

Complexity of wine grape prime names as well as synonyms is truly a result of history: attempts to classify wine grapes with what knowledge that was available at that time.  But such an effort to help and create clarity only promoted a confused state of wine grape names and synonyms that we still live with today.  Without understanding things that would only be available to us today such as DNA analysis we might think that all Trebbiano’s are all related (thank you Romans for trying).    The goal of any taxonomy system is to seek clarity, to define all components, to have reference points and to keep this tool up to date.

The wine world is vastly complex and shows things in this taxonomy that results from two major events: 1) Phylloxera 2) Scientific agriculture.  Phylloxera destroyed about 2.5 mm acres of vineyards in France hence the fever pitch of creating a wine grape to withstand Phylloxera became an industry.  There are a number of wine grape series of created wine grapes which are very large series say the Seyve Villard or Seibel series and other created wine grape varieties (both Vitis vinifera and Interspecific Crossings are numerous).   At a minimum there are at least 1/3 of all wine grape varieties are created.  The other reason is to create grapes for both earlier ripening, disease or pest resistance, increased yield etc.

So many wine grapes have been created but will never see the light of a wine bottle.  When we attempt to engineer a wine grape we often don’t have success in creating the outcomes we would like–first and foremost taste–is it compelling?  Does it ripen in the time frame needed?  Is it disease resistant?  I point to Marselan a cross between Cabernet Sauvignon and Grenache–the aim was for a wine grape variety with a higher yield per hectare.  While some of it’s end points were meet it is not the wine that people are seeking.  It is not the remarkable experience that perhaps Cabernet or Grenache is on it’s own.

While we can track both prime names of varieties and synonyms and there is still confusion today.  Négrette is a French grape and here is why accents are vital–the accent aigu first “é” distinguishes from the synonym names of Negrette (no accent mark on first “e”) which represent 1 Spanish, and 2 other French grapes–all unrelated Négrette.

I have not uploaded my taxonomy and could some day envision that it is crowd maintained and/or a body that adjudicates wine grape names and synonyms and even assures list is accurate with bona-fide wine grapes and add more source data on all wine grape varieties.

As I mentioned earlier the grape name of Cabernet Pfeffer is listed in VIVC but there is no source material to understand if this grape really exists.  For questionable citations a taxonomy should have guide rails to keeping the documentation up-to-date.  I came across a wine bottle shopping in San Francisco and was produced by Ken Volk.  There is an entry in Wine Grapes book by Robinson, Harding & Vouillamoz which questions its existence.  I saw one review online and it just took this variety at face value that it exists.  I find it hard to believe that the name of the farmer William Pfeffer named the variety after himself and oh coincidentally it is peppery??  Seems to be a bit hokey.  Kenneth Volk had DNA testing on his Cabernet Pfeffer and it was Gros Verdot (and to also clarify that Gros Verdot is not related to Petit Verdot).  The TTB has Cabernet Pfeffer in its lists of accepted grape names but not Gros Verdot.  Perhaps Ken Volk tried to get his wine labeled as Gros Verdot but couldn’t get it approved??   I have tried to find reference material for Cabernet Pfeffer and I cannot find any to substantiate this variety has existed in the past or if it even exists today.

While it may be a slide down an esoteric subject matter–naming and tracking the naming of wine grape varieties is important as consumers should know what they are getting.  Wine grape growers should have trust in vines they purchase and plant.  And winemakers should have the same assurance that the grapes they are vinifying are the grapes they purchased or grew.

If a wine producer want to buy a bottle of Gros Verdot that is much more substantiated than the mysterious Cabernet Pfeffer.  After the research I completed I did not walk away a satisfied consumer of the wine I tasted.  After all you wouldn’t want a Tannat when you really wanted a Pinot Noir (even through it was labeled a Pinot Noir) right?

While nation-states and organizations like the EU act in the interest of the EU it doesn’t necessarily help the entire taxonomy to have integrity over time.  I could see more of an adjudicating body to help keep correct naming up-to-date.

Wine as I have always said is enjoyable to taste and yet behind the curtains is the most complex consumer product in any market anywhere.  Also be certain the wine grape number I listed here will change over time as well as the number of synonyms.

What do you think about the total number of wine grapes?  What do you think about integrity of naming and synonyms?

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2018 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, graphs, photographs, logo, brand name, rating, rating, taxonomy, graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

Follow, subscribe, like, browse:

 

 

 

 

Advertisements
Posted in Biology, Taxonomy, Vitis vinifera | 2 Comments

The Retail Problem: Monoculture, Customer Experience and Complexity

I would love to know your thoughts on retail monoculture?

James Melendez - All About Business

Sears is the latest problem that shines the light on the state of US retailing.  There are so many other retailer equally endangered as well.  But the problems that exist today are not something that just happened in the past couple of years but have been decades in the making.

There are so many problems and complexities that plague the industry and the problems are opportunities but few retailers have the capabilities and leadership to harness the potentials.  The complexities have always been inherent in retailing and few “figure” them out.

Here are the top reasons why US retailers are endangering themselves:

1.Monoculture

Merchandising – all merchandise looks the same and well that is simple because most retailers use the same vendors for their private label products.  Retailers might affix their “private” label but this is noticed by consumer and thus it becomes commoditized.  Consumers and especially for someone with…

View original post 1,991 more words

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

SIP Certified – And Wouldn’t it be Great if there Was More Sustainability – James Melendez

I am asked often about many aspects of wine producing in terms of practices and sustainability.  I am glad there are a lot of questions and people seeking answers.  Consumers are interested from the journey of vineyard to wine bottle.

There is USDA Organic certification, Lodi Rules, Demeter Biodynamic, SIP Certified, etc.  While the purpose of this article is not to rank or even give a rating – rather it is important to talk about sustainability in general.  An organic certification may include a lot of biodynamic practices it may not be as comprehensive as some would like.

SIP Certified is an Atascadero, California-based organization where member wineries/vineyards are in Michigan and California.  Conceivably this could be in all wine producing states and even international.  Here is a link to view what SIP Certified is all about.

A sustainable commitment is for sound ecological practices, water management, soil conservation, commitment to resident wildlife, energy efficiency and commitment to social responsibility of all of those stakeholders involved in the production of wine (how are winery employees treated in terms of fair pay, working environment and healthcare).

A winery commitment to be in a certification program does so on a level of commitment and promise.  To belong is not just pay a membership fee but to also opening up oneself for external audit and requirements of the certification programme which not just a few things to do but a comprehensive operational features to a producer.

Now I also caution that just because a winery doesn’t belong to a certification programme doesn’t make it that those producers are not sustainable and/or use sound ecological and implement social responsibility practices etc.  A winery may not join a sustainability programme became it is a matter of economics–they simply cannot afford to belong or perhaps subscribe to all sustainable practices or even simply don’t feel the need to join.

Many consumers are concerned about pesticides, use of water, environmental impact, extensive packaging (heavy bottles), and even how wines are made Kosher, vegan and so fourth.  I hear at consumer wine events consumer asking a lot of questions of the wines they are tasting.  So there are a lot of aware wine consumers and producers who are vividly aware of those concerns.

Most consumers do care about environmental and other sustainability questions and I do think producers do take the extra step to listen, engage and enact those things they can do to make their wines as responsible as possible.

I do care about the carbon foot print wine takes in all aspects and I am glad there are programmes like SIP Certified and it would be great to see more producers adopting a sustainability practices over time even if they do not necessarily join a certain organization.

I am listing below SIP Certified wines that I have reviewed this year in 2018.

 

 

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2018 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

SIP Certified logo is owned by the SIP Certified organization.

Follow, subscribe, like, browse:

TWITTERFACEBOOKVIMEOLINKEDFLICKRpinterestWordpressYOUTUBE

Posted in Ecologically Responsible, Environmentally Responsible, Socially Responsible, Sustainability | Leave a comment

Build It and They Will Come Mindset; 15 Content Promotion Strategies – James Melendez

There is a mindset that no one really talks about but I do think many content producers come from this world:  “Build it and They Will Come.”  Magic and goodness flows just because you hit the publish button–no additional work needed.

I say this because sitting in on panels at Vidcon or WineBlogCon or elsewhere there is the talk of creating and posting content and yet amongst content producer there is the sentiment of disappointment on performance of content published.  In many cases as it is with food and wine –it is not something to be viewed/read in the first 72 hours only–it is evergreen and has a long shelf life.

The disconnect is that few content producers take the time to truly evergreen their content in terms of cultivation.  The cultivation is to repost and remind audience of content because after all once we created doesn’t mean the whole world saw it.  It meant simply that it was published.  I hear complaints about not having the resources to either both create and promote written or video content.  But the world is never a one time job; after all marketing departments are standing departments in most operations; rarely is marketing treated as a one-time only need.  Don’t be just a content producer–market your content.

Also content is finding opportunities to republish especially if it is evergreen; letting people know that it exists.  If you are a content producer and believe that you maximized your audience no need to republish but I think that is in the rarefied world that few live in.

I was at a wine dinner recently and I mentioned that wine content for producer is free to promote on social media.  I did mention I gave a talk on it’s what we have all been waiting for.  I was told that well that is great but there is the resource of time.  I said of course–the only difference between now and say a half generation ago is that you would have to pay to place your content or promotion some where in addition to creating your content.  I do think we live in the DTC (direct-to-consumer) world and hence our world is once more turned upside down but in a good way.

I do have a metric in mind when I publish my content.  I do monitor it and I have a lot of content out there 3,000 videos (wine, technology and other) and 2,500 wine articles published.  I am always aware of my average content performance and the mins and the max hit rates.  And with that I know that I am keenly aware of the below average performers.  Here are a few strategies I implement to change the low performers or opportunities to highlight great content.

15 Strategies to Help Promote Your Content:

  1. Have a benchmark of your contents metric performance (e.g. 1,000 hits; 100 views, etc.)
  2. Take the aggregate performance rate and look at the below average content (total hit rate divided by total content)
  3. When targeting your below average content performance determine if it is content that is evergreen (not dated material) I have selected and deselected based on relevancy as well
  4. Only promote that which is relevant and perhaps some material as in the case of video may not be the highest quality consider not promoting
  5. Make sure you have used all social media channels to promote (perhaps you have started using a new social media: Tumblr, Instagram etc.) Promote on those social media sites that you have not promoted previously
  6. Repost on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn – since I have published previously I would use a tag like #rewind #rewine (in case someone has seen before)
  7. Ask your followers to RT they may not always but sometimes this happens and that possibility of a larger reach is a bonus
  8. Add to respective playlists–99% of the time you can list on more than one playlist
  9. Like your own video–you are allowed to on YouTube (don’t leave this blank) – someone may like it but doesn’t hit the like button; it does encourage others to start giving a like
  10. Add to YouTube cards for your related videos
  11. On WordPress consider reblogging; you have to add a note but this is an excellent way to reminder followers
  12. Add a picture to your written pieces (obviously use a photo you have, one that is in creative commons and/or royalty free)
  13. Find opportunities to repost your video or written piece–it could be answering a question or even just letting someone know how you might have loved a certain wine and the memories that wine, food, events or travel brings back
  14. Find opportunities in published pieces to add video content (WordPress makes it easy with a YouTube functionality) and reference related and relevant articles with a link
  15. Keep the mindset that your content is relevant and though published someone who would like to read it hasn’t

Once content video or written pieces is completed the job of promoting it is not.   Over time when you have a lot of content you will have to decide which should be promoting and what doesn’t need additional promotion.  Online metrics is a slippery slope of knowing what to continue to promote or not.   An overwhelming large percentage of content producers are never happy with their content performance and a very small percentage find satisfaction in what they do.  So don’t be a dissatisfied content producer–do something about it.

Bottomline:  just because you created a written price or video doesn’t mean promotion is a one time job–it is a continuous effort.  You might be surprised that someone new is reading a piece you wrote or watching the video you produced and that is the first time they knew about your specific piece.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2018 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

Photos courtesy of Pixabay.

Follow, subscribe, like, browse:

TWITTERFACEBOOKVIMEOLINKEDFLICKRpinterestWordpressYOUTUBE

Posted in Content, Content Marketing, Evergreen, Marketing, Videos | Leave a comment

Evergreening Wine Video Content – James Melendez

The evergreen concept for wine video is a term I have never heard anyone in the wine industry use.

I use it all the time and have written about wine and video considerably.  I have looked at my wine channel on YouTube as a challenge and an opportunity.  I have been, of course, frustrated as many content producers on YouTube with arbitrary rules.   In spite of YouTube operating as vlogger Phil DeFranco’s says “I am tired of trying to deal with the alcoholic negligent stepfather that is YouTube…..”  in April of this year (2018).  In spite of the difficulties of dealing with non-logical rules on the media –I have like the term evergreen focused on continuous improvement.

I do think the wine category on YouTube has been both mis-understood by YouTube but also by the wine producer community.   The wine producers have in my experience have not always been that excited about wine video reviews.   I might get some producers that are absolutely superb and do promote my videos and even uploading video link to their website.  Others either because there is no active engagement on social media or perhaps a thanks is not needed.

I have had one producer from the Santa Cruz Mountains AVA instead of showing gratitude acted with attitude.  I kept video up and I moved forward.  I was sure the point of his negativity perhaps he felt his wine deserved more points?  I never got any additional feedback to my query.   I had one wine marketer who offered one of her wine makers for an interview to me.   I uploaded video and let her know when it was uploaded and she said she would not publicize video because it didn’t have enough hits.  I let her know it was not just my job to publicize and that I am not going to artificially increase click rate–I insisted it had to be done naturally.  This winemaker is not a well known name.  I did explain both labels and people if well known tend to do well in video click rate than lesser known regions, varieties, producers or personalities.   And I did ask for her to do her brands part to promote additionally.  Never mind that I spent time producing, editing video–I was not compensated for even my Uber ride to the site where the wine maker was pouring his wines.  I have had to do more to remind producers that what I do is for free–especially today since I am missing one critical metric that YouTube requires for monetization (I meet two out of three requirements for monetization).

Wine and video content is a superb challenge on YouTube but it need not always be the case.  Ralfystuff (Ralfydotcom) is a Scotch Whisky channel on YouTube where  he has over 100,000 subscriber and over 25 mm hits on his videos.   Now the whisky world might be considerably smaller than the wine world in terms of number of labels.  But what Ralfy highlights can be rare or obscure Scotch labels that are not available outside of Scotland.  But for the love for Scotch is finding content even on the obscure stuff.

Now I frame this around better known wines and producers have a greater click rate than say a small AVA in the US or a micro producer in Uruguay.  It has been my focus to be looking at wine regions that perhaps have received less attention or even rare varieties.  My mission is to make that which is obscure less so.  In my mission, I hope Schioppetino, Jurfark, Tazzelenghe or wines from Valle d’Aosta or Jura and many other varieties, regions and producers as something to be sought after.  I hope the rare varieties are less rare in the future that is that they get more acres/hectares planted.  My viewership has been increasing over time and I think that all metrics drive us forward as we might always see what we are doing is good but not great.  I do know that a vast majority of my 2,600+ videos are a body of work that is evergreen.  My evergreen content is a mindset as well.  I am not sitting around hoping for viewers come to watch my content but to give opportunities to view later as well and in me doing so is to remind people not just once but several times.  I am an active promoter.  I use the following hashtags to let people know it is being re-promoted – #rewine #rewind #replay.

Why?

Simply because on first publish of video didn’t mean my job ended there –it meant it was for me to leverage: repost, place on new media and channels, link to logical choices, add to specific playlists and highlight to producers for them to retweet, like, post on their site, make a comment, and so fourth.

I do have specific goals so I am not just a passive content creator “oh gosh I hope someone sees my video….” Instead my goals ares specific video channel metrics and not just looking at my average viewership but cultivated the lesser known videos as well to be viewed more often.  Daily vloggers best success is a day to 72 hours after posting–and that is it! Evergreen content is that which can be leveraged time and again not just a few days post publication.

I have talked about wine and video and have found that few people have the same interest in wine and video–as if the video medium was either useless or not valid.  I have given presentations on social media and video at few have found it an opportunity but many producers have seen it as a burden instead of another way to set themselves apart.

Much is to be gained and uncovered by video that writing cannot do alone.  A fantastic voice, great editing, moving content….. the list is endless and so are the possibilities.

So if you are a wine producer–do your part on content that someone might have posted for you already–give a like, subscribe to their channel, RT, share video on your website, make a comment–there is much that you can do.   Evergreen content is an asset to you that can be repurposed and re-engaged more than once for your customers.

If you are a viewer you can do the same thing and in doing so spreads the word on the content you just viewed.

Thank you for reading and of course thank you for watching my video content!

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2018 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

Photos courtesy of Pixabay.

Follow, subscribe, like, browse:

TWITTERFACEBOOKVIMEOLINKEDFLICKRpinterestWordpressYOUTUBE

Posted in Videos, wine, Wine and Video, Wine Promotion, Wine Videos | Leave a comment

October-September 2018 Wine, Beer and Spirits Review – James Melendez

This is a combination of two months – September and October — travel packed months.  I was able to capture this month wine, beer and one spirit.  A full fledge grouping of wine, beer and spirits–an exceptional two months of tasting.

Michel Chapoutier Bila Haut Côtes-du-Roussillon 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a Grenache and Carignan wine.

Nose: Bayberry, boysenberry, suede stacked wood

Palate: black cherry, anise, pepper, thyme

****

Descuttes Rainbow Rain Brut IPA 

White wine reminiscence though no wine was utilized in brewing this stellar IPA.  Balance of citrus, almond, white floral with uplight of hops making this an IPA without question.

 

 

 

 

****

Descuttes Pub Gather Wheat

Notes of coffee, nutmeg, lemon zest and moist stones.

 

 

 

 

 

****

Descuttes Bachelor ESB

Notes of cinnamon toast, graphite and white pepper.

 

 

 

 

 

 

****

Take it to the House IPA

Notes of cinnamon, seared, pear, apple toast, crisp and light finish.

 

 

 

 

 

 

****

Descuttes Big Limpin’ Hop Hazy

Notes of dense spices, smoke, and wood pile.

 

 

 

 

 

 

****

Descuttes Black by Popular Demand


Notes of Chocolate, Bay leaf, black pepper, toffee.

 

 

 

 

 

****

Aridus Willcox Viognier ’15 92 Points Episode #2650

****

Château Puygueraud ’15 92 Points Episode #2649

****

Cairdeas Lake Chelan Syrah Rosé ’17 93 Points Episode #2648 

****

Villa Maria Taylors Pass Pinot Noir 92 Points Episode #2647

 

****

McIntrye SLH Chardonnay ’16 Episode #2651

****

Harney Lane Lodi Old Vine Zinfandel ’15 91 Points Episode #2652

 

Seven Hills Walla Walla Cabernet Sauvignon ’14 – 92 Points Episode #2653

Aridus Willcox Tempranillo ’16 90 Points Episode #2654 

 

****

Villa Maria Taylors Pass Sauvignon Blanc 93 Points Episode #2646 

****

Milbrandt Wahluke Slope Merlot 2012 90 Points Episode #2645 

****

Savage Grace Côt ’17 93 Points – Episode #2644 

****

Zocker Edna Valley Gruner Veltliner ’16 Episode #2643

****

Murrieta’s Well Livermore Valley Merlot ’16 93 Points Episode #2642 

 

****

Opolo Central Coast Roussanne Episode #2641 91Points 

 

****

Aridus Willcox Grenache ’15 92 Points Episode #2640

****

Camut Pays d’Auge 6 ans d’âge Calvados 95 Points Episode #2639 

****

Cantina Colterenzio St. Magdalener 91 Points Episode #2638

 

****

Dusted Valley Walla Walla Syrah ’15 93 Points Episode #2637 

****

Syncline HHH Mourvèdre – ’15 Episode #2636 93 Points

 

****

Smith Madrone SMD Riesling ’15 94 Pts Episode #2635 

****

Chateau Lamothe de Haux Cuvée Traditionnelle ’15 91 Pts Episode #2633 

****

Fiddlehead SRH Pinot Noir ’13 – 93 Points Episode #2632

****

Domaine Vigneau-Chevreau Vouvray Sec ’17 Episode #2631 93 Points 

Tangent Edna Valley Sauvignon Blanc Episode ’16 #2630 92 Points James Melendez

****

Murrieta’s Well The Spur Livermore Valley Red Wine 2015 91 Points

This wine is a composition 48% Cabernet Sauvignon, 20% Petite Sirah, 18% Merlot, 8% Petit Verdot and 6% Cabernet Franc

Nose – Raspberry, black currant, baking spices and flowers

Palate – bold acidity in balance by Blackberry, red cherry, white  pepper, and dried herbs

****

Chateau Lamothe de Haux Cuvée Traditionnelle ’15 91 Pts Episode #2633 James Melendez

 

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2018 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

All wines courtesy of producer except Blason which I purchased.

Follow, subscribe, like, browse:

TWITTERFACEBOOKVIMEOLINKEDFLICKRpinterestWordpressYOUTUBE

Posted in Ale, Wine Review | Leave a comment

August 2018 Wine Reviews – James Melendez

Here are the wine I tasted this month.

 

 

 

 

 

Cathedral Ridge Columbia Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 2015 

13.2% ABV

Nose –  Loch Ness blackberry, violets freshly ground spices

Palate – rich black/red bramble notes, cassis, chocolate, pepper

****

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baileyana Edna Valley Firepeak Pinot Noir 2017

This wine is 14.2% ABV and it is a SIP certified wine.

Nose: Boysenberry, violets, crushed red candy and rose petals.

Palate:  Blackberry, cherry, coffee, Bay leaf and graphite notes

This is a SIP certified wine.

****

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chateau de L’Eperonniere Loire Rose 2017

Nose – mountain strawberry, dried lemons, flowers and moist stones

Palate – strawberry, green citrus zest and oyster shell.

****

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Domaine Des Baumard Savennières Loire Valley 2016

Nose: white peach, green citrus, beeswax

Palate:  Italian fig, Comice pear, yellow citrus

****

 

 

 

 

 

 

Domaine LeCompte Quincy 2017

Nose – Bosc pear, green apple, oyster shell

Palate – Granny Smith apple, mix of green/yellow citrus, beeswax

****

Video reviews on my YouTube channel:

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2018 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

All wines courtesy of producer except Blason which I purchased.

Follow, subscribe, like, browse:

TWITTERFACEBOOKVIMEOLINKEDFLICKRpinterestWordpressYOUTUBE

Posted in Alto Adige, Edna Valley, Lagrein, Loire Valley, Salento, Sicilia | Leave a comment