Wine and Life: Both Serving up Challenges and The Quest for The Great Vintage

Wine grapes are delicate and precious….no matter the variety, and style.  Wine and wine grapes are precious and difficult to grow, to cultivate and to vinify. 

Wine grapes unlike any other alcoholic beverage are 100% dependent on good or at least slightly cooperative weather to come to fruition.  While our environment is very challenged today—it has always been a challenge.

Hail, snow, early frost, rain, too much moisture….too much sun, humidity and other upheavals have always been present and and will be with us in the future.  And increased global temperature will certainly impact some wine regions more than others.  It doesn’t mean that Zinfandel will necessarily be growing in Scandinavian countries in the near future.  Wine grapes and where they are grown is complex now, has been and will continue to be that way.

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The grain based or non-fruit dependent alcoholic beverages have it easier; once made they are good to go—transport, hang out on a shelf, not terrible afraid of brightly oppressive neon lights.   But they will not transform or further develop in bottle like wine has the potentiality to do.

And it is one story for wine grapes to just come into the world and make it to the press and another for its vinification and even in its cellaring.  Another equation is how do wines age—in general terms some better than others.  The journey is to see what evolves and develops.  Wine in a bottle is like people.  We are different in every stages in our lives.  When we might be presented as nearly perfect the flaws can develop.  And the converse is true — I have had many a wine that seemed to be anything special but “time is the great physician” as Benjamin Disraeli once said.  Time can make people better… the same is true for some and many wines.  I have heard many people discount a wine and I alway point out maybe time lying down in the cellar can make for a treasure.   Or what is your taste expectation–maybe thinking about aged wines not being like a youthful one.

James Halliday, the Australian wine writer, once said and I paraphrase from one of my first wine books I purchased years ago “when fruit becomes wine” as it relates to aged wines.  Fruit is a delight and the aging of a wine can come unknown pleasures of enjoyment that all about sipping complexity.  

 A wine that tastes aged but also has evolved in ways of complexity and delight.  There are a few very aged wines 25+ years that survive.  It is fun when you are fortunate enough to have either held it yourself—-tasted from the library of a cellar or someone close to you that wants to share that wine.

I tasted many that have aged in 10-20 year range and I find great value when I taste several verticals—each vintage still shows through in terms of polish and pleasure; nuance and distinctiveness.

**** 

My question and belief is that the discounted wines are like discounted people: discarded without care or feedback.  Do we set up our wines for failure without setting them up for success.  Do we give an older wine a chance?  Do we treat are wines with fear…or being willing to take a chance what you have (if a great wine) can be replicated by collecting more.  Vintage does matter.

The bittersweet of a great bottle is that when it is finished that special moment is gone even if you have another bottle it may not be the same wine.  Wine is individual— which is alluring as it is humbling even disappointing.  Wine is like people and people like wine.

When was the last time you were wondering about that “-aged” Gin, vodka and beer?

****

Life is too delicate and precious; difficult and filled with adversity to not take a pause and even take a time out to appreciate….  

I have been taught in my life with being around many loving friends and family members.  Many challenges makes us who we are today.  The challenges make us sharper, distinct and a person that is wildly resilient—when we look at aging we never use positive terms.  A positive term—”vintaging” or “vintage” to each other supports a positive view of ourselves—there is value in learning… value in accumulating knowledge. 

A dear person to me was diagnosed with cancer last year and I had to take a different frame—the challenge as developing a wine is for people to survive a disease —getting to remission is the goal.  Life needs to be celebrated unto itself and the role modeling the positiveness of wine to our lives is to acknowledge the challenges, take account of our current hardships and trust that there are new and many vintages ahead.

I remind myself when feeling down or discouraged and too know challenge is all around and all the time.  Life like wine is important.  There are too people who produce wine… they are not all millionaires or lead glamorous lives—wine producers are challenged like any other agriculture professional.  Life is complex; wine is complex.

Resiliency and steadfast belief in the future is both what wine is about and absolutely what life is about. 

When you feel challenged or stressed there are symbols or emblems to look to at as reminders of not just surviving but to thrive.  Wine is not made to just be made but an intertwining of our lives and history.  Where wine first evolved in the Republic of Georgia eight millennia ago and every old world country especially westward and becoming a story of wine and a symbol to two prominent monotheistic religions.  Even behind the religious symbolism is a symbolism based in life—about living. 

I see wine as hope and promise in life and living ….. of what has been, is today and will be.  And to keep me grounded and to keep me looking up in both hard and good times. 

What does wine mean to you?

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2018 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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My Wine Tasting Wish List 2018 – James Melendez

Hello–I am still seeking most of what I have listed here. If you are an importer/distributor please let me know if you have any of these wines?

James the Wine Guy

In the past few years I have been writing about wines on my wish list for this year.

Each year, I start out with nearly a blank slate but I do have some wines left over on my tasting table from the previous year.  But I do attempt EVERY single year to taste wines from all wine regions large, small and the lesser known.

My wine ‘racetrack” motto is to taste wines from all regions and varieties each year.

Here is my list:

Oregon

  • Willamette Valley – All sub-AVAs of course
  • Rogue Valley
  • Columbia Valley
  • Umpqua
  • Applegate Valley

Washington

More than overdue for a ‘foot on ground tour’ – visited the Taste Washington which is fantastic – a must visit if you want a sampling of all wine regions from Washington State.

  • Puget Sound – last year (’17) was my first time to taste wines from this AVA
  • Columbia Gorge

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Rare Wine Varieties: Taste Them – James Melendez

When one thinks of rare varieties there might be an automatic assumption:

“They are rare for a reason”

Or rare varieties are assigned to the un-alluring “Esoteric” category.

But the history of wine grapes is complex and a story we do not fully know.

We know some relationships of the non-hybrid grapes but don’t have a full map of the relationship to one another.  If we had more knowledge and tagging where grapes descend from we might be understanding trade routes in Europe and even a greater historical perspective.

Wine grapes have been cultivated in spite of kingdom or government type or war–they moved on.  The reason is apparent.  Food and wine are needed even in spite of government type or political current or current affairs–somehow just somehow they survive–some more successful than others.

Some succeeded because of scent and flavour profiles and some just because they could withstand harsh or short growing cycles.  Pinot Noir succeeds in spite of the difficulty of cultivation and it’s very finickieness.  But if it wasn’t for it’s stellar and identifiable scent and flavour profile it might not have survived.

But I would also says some varieties became rarer because of geography or even that some wine grape varieties were not identified as such.   The Italian variety of Timorasso saved by Walter Massa in the 1980s from extinction.  For me it is an outstanding, distinct and superbly apt for food.  This is an elegant white wine from Piemonte specifically Colli Tortonesi.  This wine variety comes from a land known for it’s reds before it’s white wines–thicker skin with a longer time spent in maceration. A thick skin wine bold and yet fulfilling palate with elegance, nuance and beauty.

*****

Malagouzia is a rare Greek white wine variety that too was saved from extinction in the 1970s.  Vassilis Logothetis, a professor of enology identified this grape and one of his students Vangelis Gerovassiliou and his eponymous winery Ktima Gerovassiliou has brought this to the world stage.  Malagouzia for me is an experience of spice, heirloom apple–a dance of the palate in the aromatic plane.

*****

Embracing rare varieties ultimately means preserving them by finding engagement with people to find a new favourite red or white wine.  In doing so represents and opportunity to not just preserve but increase hectarage for wine grape cultivation of the rarer set.

I would like the variety to speak for itself versus a narrow set of varieties available to consumers.   I believe that all varieties have a place as there is a palate that has a desire to enjoy them.

I certainly recommend tasting a new or rarer variety; live outside of your comfort zone and try something new.

As much as I advocate for them–the power is in you tasting them.  Taste them–you’ll be excited to try something new.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2018 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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July 2018 Wine Reviews – James Melendez

Here are the wines I tasted this July and the notes and scores for each.

I tasted wines from Oregon, Washington, Argentina, and California in this review cycle.

Here are a collections of wines I tasted during July.

Cathedral Ridge Echo Vineyard Columbia Valley Petit Verdot 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

A stellar and successful Petit Verdot.  It is hard to get varietally label Petit Verdot right.  It is easier to get it wrong than something that is not jut adequate but expresses this noble grape with elegance and beauty.

200 case production; 13.1% ABV

Scent: Blackberry, black cherry, Thyme, Bay leaf, and baking spices

Palate: Bramble berry confit, violets, pepper and Tarragon.

Cathedral Ridge website

*****

Cathedral Ridge Dampier Vineyard Columbia Valley Pinot Noir

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Oregon’s alluring Columbia Valley this comes from Hood River Oregon–pristinely beautiful region in Oregon.  The vineyard is on the Washington side of the Columbia Valley–a region that Pinot Noir can comfortably call home and with successful for such appealing Pinot Noir.

Small case production:  400; vineyard is 1,000 feet above sea level in Underwood, Washington.  14.1% ABV

Nose: Loch Ness Blackberry, crushed red candy, violets, graphite and hint of pepper

Palate: mountain strawberry, blackberry, hint of white pepper, rose petal and Thyme.

Cathedral Ridge website

*****

Cathedral Ridge Columbia Gorge Necessity White Wine 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

This wine is a composition of Pinot Gris, Riesling and Chardonnay.

Nose of green and yellow citrus zest and pulp, white flowers, almonds, and moist stones.

Palate of green apple, green pear and Adriatic fig, almond and flowers.

Next month in August I will be reviewing Cathedral Ridge’s Cabernet Sauvignon

Cathedral Ridge website

****

Nieto Senetiner Blend Collection Mendoza Red Wine 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This wine is 55% Malbec, 30% Cabernet Franc and 15% Petit Verdot; 14% ABV

Scent: cassis, blackberry, moist red earth, leaves, suede and spice box.

Palate: Cassis, boysenberry, white pepper, Thyme and violets.

Nieto Senetiner website

****

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Concha y Toro Terrunyo Peumo Cachapoal Carménère 2016

Nose: tart red cherry, violets, dried herb and wood pile

Palate: early season cherry, mountain strawberry, pepper bay leaf, and Hoisin

Concha y Toro website

****

Hess Select North Coast Cabernet Sauvignon 2015 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This wine is low in ABV 13.5%; 35% new French and American oak for 18 months.  100% Cabernet Sauvignon

Scent: Blackberry confit, juniper forest, moist leaves on forest floor, and freshly ground spices

Palate: Blackberry, cassis, white pepper, Bay leaf and Cardamom.

Hess Collection/Select website

****

Troon Vineyard Applegate Valley Whole Grape Ferment Riesling 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

A dazzling Orange wine–in fact the first orange Riesling wine I have ever tasted.  15 year old vines, low ABV (11.5%) and skin contact makes for such a successful wine with plenty of vibrance and yet subtly so.  Vibrant and exhilarating that can be served as an aperitif wine.  This wine is available at $20.00 from the producer –an absolutely reasonable price point.

Nose: Yellow peach, dried fig, flowers, moist granite and beeswax

Palate: awash with vibrant and zippy acidity; mountain strawberry, Meyer Lemon, white flowers and moist stones.

Troon Vineyard website

*****

Julia’s Dazzle Columbia Valley Pinot Gris Rosé 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

An alluring wine with evocative nose and palate experience.  This wine is 14.1% ABV.

Scent profile: mountain strawberry, lemon preserve, freshly cut flowers and hint of sweet spice

Palate: mountain strawberry, cherry, lemon peel, almond and crushed sea shell.

Long Shadows Website

*****

Nine Hats Columbia Valley Riesling 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scent: heirloom apples, fruit orchard in autumn, Cinnamon and Cardamom.

Palate: seared Granny Smith apple, peaked Comice pear, Cinnamon and beeswax.

Nine Hats Wines

****

All of the above wines are courtesy of the producer.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2018 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

I do not own the Jackie Kennedy Onassis photograph.

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Posted in #WorldWineDay, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cachaopoal Valley, Pinot Grigio, Pinot Gris, Riesling, Rosé, Wine Review | Leave a comment

Thoughts Champagne/Sparkling Wine Glass – James Melendez

A tulip (Crate & Barrel), a coupe (Stölzle) and two tulip sparkling wine glasses (Reidel, Schott Zwiesel)

Of all wine glasses for either variety, region or style there is no more passion about design than that for sparkling wine.  Most people that I talk to about stemware for their preferences (not in the wine trade or media) prefer the flute.  But talking to people in the wine trade the tulip is king and secondarily if there are only flutes a Burgundy glass is next.

I am passionate about wine glass design.  I feel there are so few wine glasses that are the optimum glass.  There are so many technical problems out there as it relates to design and function or even price point right now in 2018.  There are many opportunities for improvement.  Price is a consideration and while not a technical flaw if too expensive most people don’t action and purchase the more expensive glass and in that thought end up buying a less-than-optimum sparkling wine glass.

The first purpose driven glass for sparkling wine glass is the Coupe.  Invented in 1663 in England way before Madame de Pompadour or Queen Marie Antoinette folkloric attribution to the design of the Coupe.  While modern day quality improvements in Champagne didn’t happen until Madame Clicquot in the 19th century the Coupe was invented and being utilised way before this time.  The recognition of sparkling wine glass and the need to see the effervescent was important; a point of difference and point of purpose glass.

The sparkling wine glass flute was also invented in the 17th century yet I cannot find anything more definitive about it’s birth.  The resulting design was to again highlight bubble action.  The missing quality of both wine glasses was for visual appreciation versus visual and smelling capability.

In either the flute or coupe viewing of bubbling is appreciable and yet the palate experience is depressed.  After all you cannot swirl or have a focused capture on scent characterization of wine in a Coupe; any slight swirl and the content’s spill out of the glass.  The Coupe is beautiful and in my early wine education days founded it evocative and absolutely beautiful.  It was refined elegance and I though this was the best way to taste.  The Coupe is popularised in the US post-prohibition.  I certainly associate it with the mid-century modern set.  I think of Camelot.  I thought there would be a lot of pictures of Jackie Kennedy Onassis with a Coupe glass in hand (see below).  Instead there is only one picture that is the only one that I believe exists.  One picture of Jackie with not just a Coupe but any wine glass in hand.  This picture was most likely when she was Jackie O.  I cannot find a citation or attribute who took photo (I found it on Pinterest).  But the reason for few photos is that she was probably rarely imbibing anything while being photographed–it just wasn’t a standard for photography then but in some ways of today.  Today unless you are in the wine trade I think people are rarely photographed this way even though billions more photos are being taken weekly if not daily.  You do see people with glass of wine in hand – Queen Elizabeth II, Michelle Obama and countless state dinners and other famous people probably much more abundantly today.

I do find this image of Jackie Kennedy Onassis amazing and symbolic of this era and the mid-century and I am glad it exists.

Jackie Kennedy Onassis – Unknown Photographer or Date/Place when this Photo was Taken

****

I was recently in Dallas and was at a restaurant in Highland Park Village.   I was served in a coupe my glass of Champagne Billecart-Salmon Brut Rosé –I could have asked for another glass but instead went with it.  While I knew it was not the optimum experience it was fun–it felt like a fancy way to enjoy my wine.  I noticed I had to be extra delicate so the wine would not spill.  It was fun to taste Champagne this way.  I indeed slowed way down in my enjoyment of this Champagne.

****

The beauty of online wine writing is that I will update this when survey closes in 6 days.

I am fascinating there is not one specific wine glass that is the overwhelming choice.  Though not a huge sample it does give insight.  I am sure at will look a bit differently after survey closes.  But I don’t think it will be radically different than this first initial capture in just a few days.

****

At least in the wine trade/media the choice is the tulip but looking around at many on-premise establishments the flute is still in large numbers out there.

I found this great title about the flute on Decanter’s site:

Should Champagne flutes be outlawed?

I love the title–there is a point of view somewhere in this article–right?

After reading this I am still not convinced in the merits of the flute.  I do think so people are missing the journey of Champagne/sparkling wine as wine.  I do think some people equate Champagne/sparkling wine in a league and origin of it’s own versus it is wine.

The base wines of any sparkling wine are fascinating and yet I do think a tulip yields the optimum in terms of taste, viewing and overall technical tasting of sparkling wine.

I do think that a tulip glass is as beautiful as a coupe or flute.  Flutes have been popular because they deliver an abundance of bubbles and in the mass easy to dish wash –certainly easier than dish washing a Coupe.

I do think it would be great to see many more tulips when I dine out in the US–truly they are as rare as rubies.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2018 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

I do not own the Jackie Kennedy Onassis photograph.

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Posted in Champagne, Prosecco, Wine Glasses | 2 Comments

June 2018 Wine Reviews – James Melendez

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Zemmer Alto Adige Pinot Nero 2017

Beautiful vitreous in coloration;  scent of mountain strawberry, pepper, moist earth leaves and violets.

Palate of rich field strawberry, white pepper, hint of herbaceous and graphite notes.

****

Peter Zemmer Alto Adige Pinot Grigio 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scent of pear, apple, honeysuckle flowers and crushed stones.

Palate of Quince, Italian fig, white flowers and oyster shell.

******

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kenwood Six Ridges Russian River Valley Pinot Noir 2015

A very appreciable RRV Pinot Noir

Scent of raspberry, strawberry, moist forest floor, fennel and freshly ground spices

palate: strawberry preserve, cherry, sweet fennel and white pepper

****

Domaine de Bila-Haut L-esquerda 2016

Scent: black cherry, pomegranate, red flowers, sweet cedar

Palate: cherry, crushed red candy, pepper, and Tarragon

****

 

 

 

 

 

 

Addendum Stage Coach Atlas Peak Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 2015

14.9% ABV

Scent: boot polish, violets, Loch Ness Blackberry, pepper and clove

Palate: Cassis, blackberry, black pepper and red flowers.

****

 

 

 

 

 

 

Addendum Rutherford Cabernet Sauvignon 2015

Scent: blackberry thicket, black cherry coulis, sweet cedar spice rack and red rose petal

Palate: Blackcherry, blackberry, pepper, clove, cardamom and rose petal

****

 

 

 

 

 

Addendum Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 2015

Scent: mountain strawberry, black cherry, clove, leather, and underbrush

Palate: black cherry sauce, pepper, Thyme and red rose petal

****

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scheid Monterey Estate Grown Riverview Vyd Grüner Veltliner 2016

14.5% ABV

Scent: white flower, myer lemon zest, beeswax and moist stones

Palate:  lemon preserve, hint of apricot preserve, flower and crushed oyster shell

****

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kenwood Vyd Sonoma County Chardonnay

Completely harmonious chardonnay delicateness and yet expressive of Sonoma County; love ABV for me is love at first sight especially for Chardonnay; a lovely creaminess of palate.

Scent: Comice pear, Italian fig, white flowers, and moist stone and

Palate: crushed oyster shell, quince, green pear, and hint of nutmeg.

 

 

****

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shallow swear Willamette Valley Rosé 2017

13.1% ABV

Scent: mountain strawberry, hint of crushed red candy, violets and sweet spice

Palate: mountain strawberry, boysenberry, white pepper, and roses.

****

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kenwood Jack London Sonoma Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon 2014

Scent: Loch Ness Blackberry, underbrush, leather, Thyme and Rose petal

Palate:  Dark cherry, blackberry, pepper, bay leaf and cardamom

****

Stayed tuned for July’s wine reviews next month.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Wine courtesy of each producer with the exception of Mercat Cava which I purchased.

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2018 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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A Classe A Visit to Hall Napa Valley Winery – James Melendez

The Emblematic Bunny Foo Foo with a Light Saber

I rarely get the chance to focus on visiting and writing about one winery in Napa Valley or anywhere.  I am constantly asked for a top list of places to visit in Napa or Sonoma but the next natural question I ask is what are you seeking either in experience, wine or both.

There isn’t just one or two places to recommend but many.  That is why I want to point out Hall in St. Helena.  A showcase of wine and art and history under one roof.   The art work is both a showpiece but also makes the total experience magical and absolutely special.

Camel Contemplating Needle – John Baldessari

The art work at Hall is not just well done it is outstanding.  How many wineries have a John Baldessari art piece–none except Hall (that I am aware of)?  There is art tastefully placed throughout.  The celebration of art work and wine is such a comfortable and exciting fit.   Wine needs and I have said as well is art;  art needs wine.

The 150 year old Bergfeld Winery building is so beautiful and respectfully restored.  You get a beautiful of west on the second floor.  Me and three great friends of mine were on the Hallmark Tour and Tasting.  The tour was professional and friendly and nicely done in terms of background, history, art focus, and, of course, wine.

The architecture of the tasting room and tank rooms was built in 2014 are so forward thinking and appreciable.  Signum is the architectural firm of record.  It is a great building; a comfortable building and exciting to see from inside and out.  Hall has intrigued me not just because of the beautiful architecture and because of the vision of owners/founders Craig and Kathryn Hall.  Originally Frank O. Gehry had designed the new winery–from the beginning it was filled with concern about being shinny and metallic design.  The final design was a wood structure which for Gehry was the first of a kind.  The Gehry design was scrapped for the LEED certified and current building by Signum.  I think it is a smart and forward thinking design that is comfortable in it’s own skin.

 

 

 

 

 

I have never seen a more attractive and inviting tank room; usually they are terribly cold and absolutely functional.  The red glass pieces on one side and the other has graphic stars and flowers—I usually look forward to leaving a tank room but this one I could have stayed much longer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the tasting you will taste from the WALT label which is a variety of Pinot Noir from Carneros, Sonoma Coast, Sta. Rita Hills, and Santa Lucia Highlands.

This is a cabernet house so there are a number you will taste (tasting of wines will vary per visit).  The cabernet’s Hall produces are mainly from Napa Valley like Kathryn Hall (flagship and highest rated wine in the collection); there is also Coeur, Jack’s Masterpiece, Diamond and Howell Mountains, Terra Secca, T-Bar T-Ranch, 1873, and Bergfeld

Here are the wines I tasted:

WALT Brown Ranch Carneros Pinot Noir 2016

Scent: Blackberry, moist crushed stone, fennel and violets

Palate: Heirloom blackberry, pepper, graphite, crushed red candy and red rose petal.

 

Hall Kathryn Hall Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 2014

Scent: Loch Ness blackberry, fresh pepper and Thyme, and red flower bunch.

Palate: Dark cherry Coulis, wild blackberry, pepper, bay leaf, and dried rose petal.

 

 

Hall Ellie’s Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 2014

Scent: Blackberry, cassis, lavender, suede.

Palate: focused bramble berries, black pepper, and autumnal herbs.

 

 

Hall Jack’s Masterpiece Cabernet Sauvignon 2012

Scent: Dark cherry, cassis, underbrush, and dried flowers.

Palate: Loch Ness blackberry confit, mix of peppers, crushed herbs and Cardamom

 

 

 

 

****

Functional at First; Art at Last

Half a Million Index Cards – WOW!

 

 

 

 

 

 

A very impressive winery to visit–a high recommendation to visit for an unforgettable experience.

Make a reservation for an unforgettable tour.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Visit to Hall Winery courtesy of producer.

© 2018 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy. James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Posted in Cabernet Sauvignon, Napa Valley, Pinot Noir, Winery | 2 Comments