Thoughts Champagne/Sparkling Wine Glass – James Melendez

A tulip (Crate & Barrel), a coupe (Stölzle) and two tulip sparkling wine glasses (Reidel, Schott Zwiesel)

Of all wine glasses for either variety, region or style there is no more passion about design than that for sparkling wine.  Most people that I talk to about stemware for their preferences (not in the wine trade or media) prefer the flute.  But talking to people in the wine trade the tulip is king and secondarily if there are only flutes a Burgundy glass is next.

I am passionate about wine glass design.  I feel there are so few wine glasses that are the optimum glass.  There are so many technical problems out there as it relates to design and function or even price point right now in 2018.  There are many opportunities for improvement.  Price is a consideration and while not a technical flaw if too expensive most people don’t action and purchase the more expensive glass and in that thought end up buying a less-than-optimum sparkling wine glass.

The first purpose driven glass for sparkling wine glass is the Coupe.  Invented in 1663 in England way before Madame de Pompadour or Queen Marie Antoinette folkloric attribution to the design of the Coupe.  While modern day quality improvements in Champagne didn’t happen until Madame Clicquot in the 19th century the Coupe was invented and being utilised way before this time.  The recognition of sparkling wine glass and the need to see the effervescent was important; a point of difference and point of purpose glass.

The sparkling wine glass flute was also invented in the 17th century yet I cannot find anything more definitive about it’s birth.  The resulting design was to again highlight bubble action.  The missing quality of both wine glasses was for visual appreciation versus visual and smelling capability.

In either the flute or coupe viewing of bubbling is appreciable and yet the palate experience is depressed.  After all you cannot swirl or have a focused capture on scent characterization of wine in a Coupe; any slight swirl and the content’s spill out of the glass.  The Coupe is beautiful and in my early wine education days founded it evocative and absolutely beautiful.  It was refined elegance and I though this was the best way to taste.  The Coupe is popularised in the US post-prohibition.  I certainly associate it with the mid-century modern set.  I think of Camelot.  I thought there would be a lot of pictures of Jackie Kennedy Onassis with a Coupe glass in hand (see below).  Instead there is only one picture that is the only one that I believe exists.  One picture of Jackie with not just a Coupe but any wine glass in hand.  This picture was most likely when she was Jackie O.  I cannot find a citation or attribute who took photo (I found it on Pinterest).  But the reason for few photos is that she was probably rarely imbibing anything while being photographed–it just wasn’t a standard for photography then but in some ways of today.  Today unless you are in the wine trade I think people are rarely photographed this way even though billions more photos are being taken weekly if not daily.  You do see people with glass of wine in hand – Queen Elizabeth II, Michelle Obama and countless state dinners and other famous people probably much more abundantly today.

I do find this image of Jackie Kennedy Onassis amazing and symbolic of this era and the mid-century and I am glad it exists.

Jackie Kennedy Onassis – Unknown Photographer or Date/Place when this Photo was Taken

****

I was recently in Dallas and was at a restaurant in Highland Park Village.   I was served in a coupe my glass of Champagne Billecart-Salmon Brut Rosé –I could have asked for another glass but instead went with it.  While I knew it was not the optimum experience it was fun–it felt like a fancy way to enjoy my wine.  I noticed I had to be extra delicate so the wine would not spill.  It was fun to taste Champagne this way.  I indeed slowed way down in my enjoyment of this Champagne.

****

The beauty of online wine writing is that I will update this when survey closes in 6 days.

I am fascinating there is not one specific wine glass that is the overwhelming choice.  Though not a huge sample it does give insight.  I am sure at will look a bit differently after survey closes.  But I don’t think it will be radically different than this first initial capture in just a few days.

****

At least in the wine trade/media the choice is the tulip but looking around at many on-premise establishments the flute is still in large numbers out there.

I found this great title about the flute on Decanter’s site:

Should Champagne flutes be outlawed?

I love the title–there is a point of view somewhere in this article–right?

After reading this I am still not convinced in the merits of the flute.  I do think so people are missing the journey of Champagne/sparkling wine as wine.  I do think some people equate Champagne/sparkling wine in a league and origin of it’s own versus it is wine.

The base wines of any sparkling wine are fascinating and yet I do think a tulip yields the optimum in terms of taste, viewing and overall technical tasting of sparkling wine.

I do think that a tulip glass is as beautiful as a coupe or flute.  Flutes have been popular because they deliver an abundance of bubbles and in the mass easy to dish wash –certainly easier than dish washing a Coupe.

I do think it would be great to see many more tulips when I dine out in the US–truly they are as rare as rubies.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2018 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

I do not own the Jackie Kennedy Onassis photograph.

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Posted in Champagne, Prosecco, Wine Glasses | 1 Comment

June 2018 Wine Reviews – James Melendez

Peter Zemmer Alto Adige Pinot Nero 2017

Beautiful vitreous in coloration;  scent of mountain strawberry, pepper, moist earth leaves and violets.

Palate of rich field strawberry, white pepper, hint of herbaceous and graphite notes.

****

Peter Zemmer Alto Adige Pinot Grigio 2017

 

 

Scent of pear, apple, honeysuckle flowers and crushed stones.

Palate of Quince, Italian fig, white flowers and oyster shell.

******

Kenwood Six Ridges Russian River Valley Pinot Noir 2015

A very appreciable RRV Pinot Noir

Scent of raspberry, strawberry, moist forest floor, fennel and freshly ground spices

palate: strawberry preserve, cherry, sweet fennel and white pepper

****

Domaine de Bila-Haut L-esquerda 2016

Scent: black cherry, pomegranate, red flowers, sweet cedar

Palate: cherry, crushed red candy, pepper, and Tarragon

****

 

 

 

 

 

Addendum Stage Coach Atlas Peak Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 2015

14.9% ABV

Scent: boot polish, violets, Loch Ness Blackberry, pepper and clove

Palate: Cassis, blackberry, black pepper and red flowers.

****

 

 

 

 

 

 

Addendum Rutherford Cabernet Sauvignon 2015

Scent: blackberry thicket, black cherry coulis, sweet cedar spice rack and red rose petal

Palate: Blackcherry, blackberry, pepper, clove, cardamom and rose petal

****

 

 

 

 

 

Addendum Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 2015

Scent: mountain strawberry, black cherry, clove, leather, and underbrush

Palate: black cherry sauce, pepper, Thyme and red rose petal

****

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scheid Monterey Estate Grown Riverview Vyd Grüner Veltliner 2016

14.5% ABV

Scent: white flower, myer lemon zest, beeswax and moist stones

Palate:  lemon preserve, hint of apricot preserve, flower and crushed oyster shell

****

Kenwood Vyd Sonoma County Chardonnay

Completely harmonious chardonnay delicateness and yet expressive of Sonoma County; love ABV for me is love at first sight especially for Chardonnay; a lovely creaminess of palate.

Scent: Comice pear, Italian fig, white flowers, and moist stone and

Palate: crushed oyster shell, quince, green pear, and hint of nutmeg.

 

 

****

 

 

 

 

Shallow swear Willamette Valley Rosé 2017

13.1% ABV

Scent: mountain strawberry, hint of crushed red candy, violets and sweet spice

Palate: mountain strawberry, boysenberry, white pepper, and roses.

****

Kenwood Jack London Sonoma Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon 2014

Scent: Loch Ness Blackberry, underbrush, leather, Thyme and Rose petal

Palate:  Dark cherry, blackberry, pepper, bay leaf and cardamom

****

Stayed tuned for July’s wine reviews middle of next month.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Wine courtesy of each producer with the exception of Mercat Cava which I purchased.

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2018 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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A Classe A Visit to Hall Napa Valley Winery – James Melendez

The Emblematic Bunny Foo Foo with a Light Saber

I rarely get the chance to focus on visiting and writing about one winery in Napa Valley or anywhere.  I am constantly asked for a top list of places to visit in Napa or Sonoma but the next natural question I ask is what are you seeking either in experience, wine or both.

There isn’t just one or two places to recommend but many.  That is why I want to point out Hall in St. Helena.  A showcase of wine and art and history under one roof.   The art work is both a showpiece but also makes the total experience magical and absolutely special.

Camel Contemplating Needle – John Baldessari

The art work at Hall is not just well done it is outstanding.  How many wineries have a John Baldessari art piece–none except Hall (that I am aware of)?  There is art tastefully placed throughout.  The celebration of art work and wine is such a comfortable and exciting fit.   Wine needs and I have said as well is art;  art needs wine.

The 150 year old Bergfeld Winery building is so beautiful and respectfully restored.  You get a beautiful of west on the second floor.  Me and three great friends of mine were on the Hallmark Tour and Tasting.  The tour was professional and friendly and nicely done in terms of background, history, art focus, and, of course, wine.

The architecture of the tasting room and tank rooms was built in 2014 are so forward thinking and appreciable.  Signum is the architectural firm of record.  It is a great building; a comfortable building and exciting to see from inside and out.  Hall has intrigued me not just because of the beautiful architecture and because of the vision of owners/founders Craig and Kathryn Hall.  Originally Frank O. Gehry had designed the new winery–from the beginning it was filled with concern about being shinny and metallic design.  The final design was a wood structure which for Gehry was the first of a kind.  The Gehry design was scrapped for the LEED certified and current building by Signum.  I think it is a smart and forward thinking design that is comfortable in it’s own skin.

 

 

 

 

 

I have never seen a more attractive and inviting tank room; usually they are terribly cold and absolutely functional.  The red glass pieces on one side and the other has graphic stars and flowers—I usually look forward to leaving a tank room but this one I could have stayed much longer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the tasting you will taste from the WALT label which is a variety of Pinot Noir from Carneros, Sonoma Coast, Sta. Rita Hills, and Santa Lucia Highlands.

This is a cabernet house so there are a number you will taste (tasting of wines will vary per visit).  The cabernet’s Hall produces are mainly from Napa Valley like Kathryn Hall (flagship and highest rated wine in the collection); there is also Coeur, Jack’s Masterpiece, Diamond and Howell Mountains, Terra Secca, T-Bar T-Ranch, 1873, and Bergfeld

Here are the wines I tasted:

WALT Brown Ranch Carneros Pinot Noir 2016

Scent: Blackberry, moist crushed stone, fennel and violets

Palate: Heirloom blackberry, pepper, graphite, crushed red candy and red rose petal.

 

Hall Kathryn Hall Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 2014

Scent: Loch Ness blackberry, fresh pepper and Thyme, and red flower bunch.

Palate: Dark cherry Coulis, wild blackberry, pepper, bay leaf, and dried rose petal.

 

 

Hall Ellie’s Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 2014

Scent: Blackberry, cassis, lavender, suede.

Palate: focused bramble berries, black pepper, and autumnal herbs.

 

 

Hall Jack’s Masterpiece Cabernet Sauvignon 2012

Scent: Dark cherry, cassis, underbrush, and dried flowers.

Palate: Loch Ness blackberry confit, mix of peppers, crushed herbs and Cardamom

 

 

 

 

****

Functional at First; Art at Last

Half a Million Index Cards – WOW!

 

 

 

 

 

 

A very impressive winery to visit–a high recommendation to visit for an unforgettable experience.

Make a reservation for an unforgettable tour.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Visit to Hall Winery courtesy of producer.

© 2018 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy. James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Posted in Cabernet Sauvignon, Napa Valley, Pinot Noir, Winery | 2 Comments

On the Quest for the Best Wine Glass – James Melendez

While I am always on the quest for the best wine glass… notice I didn’t say I am seeking a perfect wine glass.

I don’t believe in perfection in general and that extends to my wine glass as well.

Left to right: Riedel Sommelier, Holmegaard, Schott Zwiesel, Crate & Barrel Red Wine Glass and Sparkling Wine Glass

Not so long ago there were fewer options in the US and today there are many more choices than ever before.  Simply the interest in wine has been matched by all major and even minor producers exporting their glasses to the US.

I am particular because why serve an outstanding wine in a mediocre or subpar wine glasses?  I have been to places where an amazing wine is served in a less than desirable glass that had been made in a glass factory long long ago.   Just like a well crafted wine might cost more than a mass produced one the same holds true for a well crafted wine glass.

I have noted in my videos that I have been to fantastic restaurants in San Francisco to be disappointingly served in a glass that might have cost a dollar.  In that same video I have noted that I have been to many a small towns in Europe and guess what–the wine glasses were outstanding…. stellar.   I always feel super special where the wine glass programme is as strong as the wine list itself.

I think of my trips to Champagne; my last visit to the region I was eating at a small and amazing roadside bistro and there were Zalto wine glasses there.  Not uncommon in Champagne.  I have experienced this in Italy as well showcasing fantastic wine glasses in the dining setting.  I think of what most expect San Francisco to be ultra sophisticated place and I alway point out New York is the US’s most sophisticated city–luxuriant wine lists and wine glasses.  I would like to bring my own wine glass when I go to a nice restaurant that doesn’t have a nice wine glass programme in San Francisco.  Now, of course, and as expected restaurants like Gary Danko, Boulevard, Jardinière do have a nice wine glass programme but there are many other restaurants who don’t.

Your Home’s Wine Glass Programme

I don’t expect everyone to be as particular as I am about a fantastic wine glass or even as experimental as I am.  First you don’t need a wine glass in every silhouette the wine glass maker might make.  Here is a very short list of glasses for your home:

  • Sparkling wine glass – think tulip versus flute
  • White wine glass
  • Red wine glass
    • Bordeaux
    • Burgundy
  • Dessert wine glass

While I am not going to recommend a specific brand because you should find a style that you like.  I would also try to steer not just towards look but functionality.  A red wine glass is my litmus test, as example, you should be easy to swirl the wine in glass where the contents are not going to spill out easily AND very importantly can handle the swirling action; once you stop swirling and you let go–does the wine glass wobble?  Wobbling is a bad thing–in my opinion this is a great way for glass to tip on the chance of a very active swirler.  It is not just about the possibility of tipping but how does the wine glass with a decent pour feel like?  Does it feel like there is no centre of gravity?   If that is the case of the feel of that experience will be noticeable to you and guests.

I drink daily from my Schott Zwiesel Pure Collection wine glasses; they have been quite dependable, very modern design but serve their function well.  These glasses are easy to find and I look for best price, potential airline miles (via airline shopping portals) and best delivery option.

I do have one restaurant Riedel Bordeaux glass that is quite nice–I purchased at Silverado Winery for no more than $20.00 while it may look like the Riedel Sommelier Bordeaux glass they are not the same.  The Riedel Sommelier is boldly different and unapologetic; highly usable and completely elegant.  The Riedel Sommelier are not for the faint of heart at over $100 per glass.  I did ping the restaurant and the sommelier glass and they sing differently–the restaurant stem has a nice reverberation but not like the stunningly near operatic quality of the Sommelier.  I do use my Sommelier but infrequently–as a treat to myself.  I also don’t want to never use the glass.  I am ultra careful when washing and wash the base ever so gently.

I had a few Spiegelau stems and they were nice glassware from a home and decor store that I no longer purchase from but from $7-8 dollars a stem a good value.  If I can find them again I will try purchasing again.

I love Holmegaard and swear by this Danish wine glass producer; elegant and beautiful and about $24-$28 a stem.  Superb vessel and one that I use frequently and found the deliver of wine to palate to be such a fine instrument.  Holmegaard are not plentiful in the marketplace but distinctive enough to be sought after.

I love Zalto wine glasses–and I would say is my favourite brand right now.  Expensive $60 a stem but completely elegant, so superbly designed–almost stretch a limit but not over the top in terms of design.  Completely delicate–handle with absolute care.

I came to Zalto because their sparkling wine glass – the tulip shape is the reigning star of sparkling wine glasses.  While there are others who produce a tulip Zalto’s are the best.  When I have a glass of sparkling wine and I am near the glass I know it is a Zalto and no other brand.  I feel ultra special when I use this brand.  I do enjoy sparkling wine frequently I am careful to not over use them.  I cry when one breaks…. so I was seeking what I call and every day tulip wine glass.  I did find one from Crate & Barrel called Calla and it was only $8.95.  The glasses are made in Slovakia and Crate & Barrel does not publish who manufactured these glass I am guessing they are from the producer RONA.  The glass is so well designed and absolutely stunningly beautiful it can be my every day sparkling wine glass.  I did Crate & Barrel’s Bordeaux wine glass and the same design for a red wine is not as stable in terms of swirling–the centre of gravity is in question.  While beautiful in design and for me less practice for an every day red wine glass.  Attractive price point but the usage I’ll get will be minimal.  Crate & Barrel does such an amazing job in deliver of wine glass–so securely wrapped–the best I have seen of any US retailer.

I have and will continue to be experimental in wine glass purchasing I will still seek excellence and I advocate every do the same.  And I have not tried every wine glass at this point–many more try.

Your wine will thank you when you engage in smart and well made wine glasses.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2018 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy. James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2018 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Book Review: Urban Grape’s Drink Progressively by Hadley and TJ Douglas – 95 Points

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Urban Grape’s Drink Progressively by Hadley and TJ Douglas

Price: $27.00

ISBN: 978-1-940611-58-7

I LOVE WINE BOOKS.   I read wine books for many reasons–I love to hear about how other people beyond myself write about wine.  I want to know another person’s perspective. I love the subject and I appreciate and worship all that is wine.   The owners of The Urban Grape TJ and Hadley Douglas have written a book on the subject of their shop: wine – few wine retailers do this for one reason–it is very time consuming to operate a wine retail business.  It is not just commitment to wine but a passion of wine to want to write a book on this subject.

The book is a progressive approach to looking at wine in terms of a 1-10W (white – 10 sections) and 1-10R (red 10 sections) in terms of body and weight of wine.  The book is superbly easy to read yet informative and not wine geeky. This is a book I would recommend to anyone wanting to learn about wine.  I remember in the near prehistoric days when I worked at a wine retailer in college and there was no formal training programme–there was no texts–I call this era BWB (Before Wine Books) and I am not that ancient!!  I would have loved a book like this to read.

The language is respectful of the reader; the writing style is approachable and completely interesting.  This book also balances out knowledge that is pertinent and honest.  

I like the touches of having “one’s to try” which are specific wine produces to taste and try.  It is so hard to point out a specific producer in any wine text–the frame of the book truly picks fantastic and relevant to each section.  There are tiny and important “geek out” sections talking about wine barrels to to wine clones to taming the sweet tooth.

I appreciate the point out of wine regions and varieties to each of the sections–the examples are specific and help to familiarize Sancerre to Sauvignon Blanc in Napa Valley and the defining characteristics.   

*****

The Perfect Pairings in the lower right corner give food suggestions in each wine section

There are books on food and wine and often they are unbalanced that is too much much food just a tad about wine.  But this book gives a great balance of food and wine. The recipes of the beautifully photographed food is by Chef Gabriel Frasca.  I am naturally a cookbook collector and very much appreciate thoughtfulness of well designed recipes.

A lot of Fantastic Recipes – Slow Roasted Salmon as an example.

I like the breadth and scope of recipes–delicious and awe inspiring.  I have a nice collection of cookbooks and have found great appreciation for all that I own.  I would never part with any of them.  Some are autographed or obscure like a cookbook from the Amana community in Iowa.  Cookbooks are much needed to keep us from getting bored with what we might be preparing.  I know for me I need constant enhancements and ideas in the frontier of cooking in my house.

The recipes by Chef Frasca are inspired and meant to be easy to prepare well made dishes.  I have marked what I will be preparing next. Here is what I have decided to make next from this book:

  • Basel Salad with Almond Vinaigrette and Candied Lemon
  • Grilled Shrimp with Pistachio Romesco
  • Crab Toast with Mango Salad
  • Slow Roasted Salmon with Bacon Braised Cabbage

*****

The book covers Rosé and sparkling wines in addition to the white and red wine.  The friendly approach to the subject makes this a welcomed reading as well as concise language.  Even busy people can read this book and glean much knowledge on wine.

This is a great gift for someone who is starting to become interested in wine or even someone who loves to cook and enjoys pairing wine with food.

A very nice read!

The wine store of Hadley and TJ Douglas:

The Urban Grape

303 Columbus Avenue
Boston, MA  02116
857 250 2509

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Book was courtesy of publisher/PR agency.

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2018 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy. James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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May 2018 Wine Reviews – James Melendez

Here are the wines landing on my table for a May 2018 review:

 

 

 

 

 

Mercat Cava Brut Nature 

A lovely and inexpensive Cava Brut Nature – Brut Nature is such a loving way to enjoy sparkling wine.  Aptly and appreciable dry–but not as dry as one might imagine.  An optimum wine for food and I enjoy drinking without food as well.

Scent: green apple, hint of apricot, white tea and flowers

Palate: Granny Smith apple, green fig, almonds and moist stones

*****

Black Magnolia Willamette Valley Pinot Noir 2015

Scent: Mountain strawberry, rose petal, stones and pepper.

Palate: strawberry, red cherry, pepper, graphite and tea.

*****

Marques Casa Concha Peumo Carménère 2016

Scent: mix of blue/black bramble berries, evergreen forest, freshly ground pepper and suede

Palate: Blueberry, sweet spices, Thyme and black pepper.

*****

Scent: fresh white peach, almond, moist granite and flowers

Palate: fleshy yellow peach, green apple, hint of sweet spice and almond.

*****

Nine Hats Columbia Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 2015

  • 89% Cabernet Sauvignon
  • 11% Malbec

Scent: Black cherry, rose petals, Thyme, moist earth and evergreen forest

Palate: Black cherry confit, black pepper, hoisin, and Tarragon.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Wine courtesy of each producer with the exception of Mercat Cava which I purchased.

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2018 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Posted in Cava, Wine Review, Wine Table | Leave a comment

May 2018 Albariño Tasting – James Melendez

I was delighted to participate in this large Snooth wine tasting featuring 11 Albariño on 16-May-2018 – it is unusual and, of course, a welcome experience to taste through so many wonderful Galician wines.

 

 

*****

Señorio de Rubios Robaliño Rías Baixas Albariño 2017

Scent: green apple, green pear, green fig, jasmine, and moist stone.
Palate: quince, green apple, hint of dried fig and green tea.

 

 

 

*****

Bodegas Alto de Torona Rosal Rías Baixas Albariño Caino Loureiro 2017

This wine has such a unique bottle – a great bottle format – nicely modern.  This wine is a composition of Albariño, Caino, and Loureiro.  Superbly low in ABV.

Scent: white nectarine, Adriatic fig, crushed oyster shell, and flowers.

Palate: Kiwi, fleshy yellow peach, green apple and hint of moist mineral.

*****

Condes de Albarei Rías Baixas Albariño 2016 

Scent: Meyer lemon, white peach, Italian fig and moist stones.

Palate: rich sweet lime, white tea, flowers, and moist granite

 

 

*****

Nai e Señora Rías Baixas Albariño 2016 

Vibrant acid, hint of effervescence.

Scent: Green apple, white nectarine, almond, moist stones

Palate:  Yellow peach, raw almond, tea and beeswax.

*****

Paco & Lola Rías Baixas Albariño 2017

Scent: Bosc pear, sliced green apple, moist granite and freshly cut flowers

Palate: Heirloom apple, moist stone, sesame and almond.

 

 

 

 

*****

Fillaboa Rías Baixas Albariño 2016

Scent: mix of freshly cut green fruit, flowers, stones and green tea 

Palate: Citron, green pear, piñon (pine nut), and almond

 

 

 

 

*****

 

Adegas Galegas D. Pedro D Sotomaior Rías Baixas Albariño 2016

Scent: white flowers, mix of green and yellow citrus zest and pulp, white peach

Palate: White peach/nectarine, pear, hint of almond and crushed sea shell

 

 

 

 

*****

Laxas Rías Baixas Albariño 2017

Scent: white pear and nectarine, Calla Lily, and green citrus

Palate: Quince, Kiwi and moist crushed granite.

 

 

 

 

*****

Terras Gauda Rías Baixas Albariño 2017

70% Albariño, 20% Caiño, and 10% Loureiro; 12.5% ABV 

Scent: Moist rock, mix of green and red apple, green fig and Quince

Palate: Green citrus, Italian fig, toasted almonds, and flowers

 

 

 

 

*****

Pazo Senorañs Rías Baixas Albariño 2017

Scent: green-gold citrus, fleshly yellow nectarine, dried apricot and almond.

Palate: Green citrus zest, quince, moist stones and flowers.

 

 

 

 

*****

Valmiñor Rías Baixas Albariño 2017

Scent: Green citrus, white stone fruit, apples, and moist crushed stones,

Palate: seared pear and green fig, moist slate, almond and honeycomb

 

 

 

 

Wines courtesy of producer, importer and Snooth.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

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