The State of Wine Glassware: A Desperate Need for Better Wine Glasses – James Melendez

The state of wine glassware today (2019) is that so many places or events is that wine glassware is either unimportant or an afterthought.  Our current state of wine glassware is one of disappointment or solutions that are profoundly expensive.

While our wine selections in even a short period of time has improved in just a generation is compelling and amazing.  As an example of improved wine selections availability is on or off-premise are Sicilian wines which a generation ago (14 years) I would have struggled to find a single label of Sicilian wine in San Francisco.  But today there is vast improvement in wine producers selections in the market place–is it perfect?  No, but it is but much better than it has ever been.  I think there is a state of continuous improvement that is needed for wine as not all wine regions are available.

And then there is need for a vast leap of improvement for wine glassware design, quality, pricing and distribution.

The best place to begin a discussion on glassware is to look at trade/media master classes.  I have been to dozens and overall I have found the presentation and content to be “good” to “very well done” but the wines are not getting the true appreciation that I think they deserve.  Last Fall (2018) I attended a master classes of two very well regarded appellations and the information presented quite good but the wines I thought uniform to un-interesting.  I had to stop and I said to myself “wait… this is from appellation X and Y” I love these two wine regions and adore each bottle I get to taste.  Each wine I tasted was linear and uninteresting… wines were from both well-known and lesser known producers.  It’s not the wine… it is the wine glasses masking the beauty of each drop of wine poured.

I will not mention these specific master classes as I want to keep that information confidential as this event is amongst many others with the same issue.  Non wine glass sponsored events promise to not highlight wines in non-optimum vessels.  I think that glassware is so important that it elevates and makes a wine event or master class successful and worse when it is a substandard glass that the journalist or wine enthusiast walks away with little or unfavouable impressions.

Why is it specifically about a poorly designed, mass-produced wine glass that makes for a less-than-successful wine experience?

  • Bowl is not optimized – too narrow, not long enough
  • Rim does not allow for proper smelling of wine – tapered inward with little access for nose
  • Rim is at a ninety degree angle to bottom of bowl which will not capture the nose of the wine but instead doesn’t translate the molecules to the nose; it also makes a swirl a promise to spill the wine
  • Lower portion of the bowl is too flat–which limits swirling capability, so while the wine molecules are doing their part during swirling state; it hides or does not express the wine fully
  • Novel and non-functioning designs – a flute is pretty but it does not allow for full senses appreciation – bubbles look great but that is as good as it gets
  • The coupe dissipates any scent opportunity–swirling strictly prohibited Beautiful but it does not work to showcase a sparkling wine
  • Mass produced wine glasses – if it is too shallow there is a bounce back of a singular note–no other complex notes can be highlighted.  I would say most wine glasses I have experience in North America are of this flavour
  • Material can come into play and specifically a glass and non-crystal or specialised material can perform poorly by not being able to be washed too often in the dishwasher and simply don’t look or feel good; or doesn’t allow for the transfer to palate and nose seamlessly

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I would say north of 90% of wine events need a leap of improvement.  Wine producers should be more active in making sure when they serve wines at an event it can accurately capture the wine poured.  Producers could be, I believe, a bit more demanding and I think this request is not abnormal but absolutely important request.

Wine trade organizations or consortiums that are pouring/presenting their wines should have their PR agency or wine educator to request either a specific glass or at least object to a style that may not fit their wines.  As a wine trade organization or consortium they should ask PR agency or wine educator for a wine glass to inspect and approve.  I do know that wine educators buy a lot of wine glasses and could have them readily available for inspection.  I know a wine educator who looks for the least expensive and pays about a $1 a stem or less–they are constantly on the look out for cheap wine glasses–basically they are mass produced and not well designed glasses for wine.  I have asked why they buy these glass and why they haven’t looked at contracting with a reputable wine glass producer for, at least, a restaurant quality version.  Their response signaled to me is they needed the lowest priced glass possible is what they prefer.

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On premise (restaurants and bars) have no reason why they cannot guarantee higher quality wine glassware.  While most if not all somm-lead on premise businesses tend to have better glassware.  But those that don’t have a professional wine director or somm often have less-than-optimum glassware.  I have experienced in one of San Francisco oldest restaurants that I like to dine and has very nice food but the glassware is appalling–in this restaurant’s example is not just a quality issue it is an issue pouring many glasses per bottle 6 to 1.  I want to go to this restaurant for their very nice Cioppino but immediately the entire experience is not optimum.  I have not brought my own glass though as tempting as it might be–it is not what I should be doing based on what I pay for the wine.  If I am paying a 50 to 100% markup and I do expect the cost to insure the proper vessel–after all I am paying a premium.  I am surprised any restaurant serving wine chooses a poor wine glass.  What does this cost?  I think twice about going back to that restaurant as a consumer.  I also think that a restaurant is leaving a potential customer dollar spend on the table–the customer leaves without another glass or even bottle purchase.  The intrigue and delight is not there for the restaurant patron.  I have been served wine in a French jelly jar just last month in a San Francisco restaurant.  First, I never suffer in silence–I do ask for an alternative–but I have never had a single request turn into better wine glass.  I think it is important to give direct feedback to a restaurant regardless of what they might do.

And while a restaurant might have good stemware their offering might dictate great stemware.  As an example, I was at a tasting menu where (and with wine) it was easily a $400 per person experience.  I wanted high-end glassware–Zalto should have been part of their wine programme but it wasn’t.  If there is a high-priced meal the customer deserves the best experience possible.

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I think of every time I step foot in Champagne I have never had one single substandard glass regardless of where I dined or tasted wines solely.  I remember dining at Le Bois Joli in Saint-Imoges north of Épernay–there is no equivalent in the US that represents this experience.  Saint-Imoges is not exactly Épernay and yet the food, the service and the serving pieces and glassware are outstanding–portions that were easily equivalent to a full days of eating (breakfast, lunch and dinner) impeccable and stellar glassware and serve wear that was equally impressive.  It is nice to have your Caussolet served in an individual serving bowl from Le Creuset and nonetheless in my favourite colour: orange.  This restaurant, of course, served the best of food and wine and cares about it’s presentation because it is in Champagne.

I cannot quite compare Le Bois Joli to a Napa or Yountville restaurant –it would be like driving up in a rural part of a northern California wine country and finding a fine restaurant standing alone in a small village which Yountville would not be that village.  Champagne is always tops of mind for a great presentation.

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I think the quest for the perfect or near perfect remains elusive; and not just design but material, price point, quality of stemware and accessibility is not an easy proposition even in today’s marketplace.  Most individual consumers still buy wine glasses on brand and consumers are still not always happy with what they are getting.  Regardless people and it is a normal thing to feel greater disappointment when a very expensive glass is broken than a lesser expensive one.

I am buying fewer super expensive wine glasses $50-100 because breaking one is well…. heart breaking.  I do find one silhouette amazingly difficult to find at a reasonable price point.  A tulip wine glass for sparkling wine is elusive–I have found a “cheaper” version but it does not dazzle me or I do not feel a sense of satisfaction.  This silhouette is elusive and yet I do think of a better design suited to sparkling wine.

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My viewers on my YouTube wine channel consume my wine glass videos at a 4.5x greater rate than the average view of my total wine videos.  My second most watched video (showing a few below) is at 8,500 clicks which in wine video parlance is superbly difficult to reach.  Like all other videos, I hope and plan for all to be a success and yet this is one that I would never have suspected to do so well as it did.  The data suggests there is a much greater interest in wine glassware for very practical purposes.  It suggests a wine consumer who wants to learn all they can and perhaps drive towards a solution for their table top.

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I have long advocated for a better silhouette compelled with unparalleled elegance and leanness in design at a smart price point and good material–this is not found in today’s market place.  Not only do I think there is an opportunity for great design there is a proposition for better material, accessibility and price point.

Nonetheless I have so much more to say about glassware in future articles!

The Good: (L) Holmegaard sparkling wine glass, (M) Tulip (not certain of brand) and (R) Holmegaard Burgundy glass

The Bad: (L) a 90-Degree angle (M) A non-angle rim glass and (R) mass produced glass

The Ugly: I don’t know anything about these mass produced glasses; just that they are poor performers

Below are videos I have completed on specific glassware as well as general comments.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2019 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, graphs, photographs, logo, brand name, rating, rating, taxonomy, graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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This Week in Wine February 10, 2019 – James Melendez

“I just can’t stop the rain” Tina Turn sang multiple of decades ago.  And this is the week that the rain is a bit much for me.  For several winters in San Francisco there was not a drop of rain during winter–and yes it was an issue.  But it seems in terms of weather pattern it is a state of only wet or only dry.  Moderation or a wider distribution of rain seems not possible.

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I remember speaking to a wine maker in December and I remember saying when will we see 15% and above ABV Chardonnay and Pinot Noirs?  He said he hoped never.  I said I think we will see them…  I dread the notion though.  And just as I had predicted I would taste a 15% ABV wine sooner rather than later.  I am A-OK with Zinfandel being in 15% or above–not loving it usually but I can accept it.  I actually find Zinfandel lower than 15% much more appreciable.

15% and above Pinot Noir is not something I want to experience routinely.  I do not accept–“well.. it doesn’t taste hot” I do taste the heat and it is on the initial palate exposure that it is completely understood as highly alcoholic.

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This week I was excited to reach 400k clicks on my wine channel on YouTube.  I won’t belabour that milestone but for me I like to highlight it because it is excruciatingly hard to get there.

 

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In other news, I have been more proactive in requesting from producers wines to sample–the old way of crossing fingers and hoping someone reads your mind is terribly ineffective.  One producer I reached to this week said they knew who I was and appreciated positive comments on past vintages of their wine.  I did give a compelling reason and not the “just give me a bottle” but more of a media kit reason with data points of performance and I was told “no.” And I paraphrase “but if you get a high profile publication then we will consider giving a bottle.”   What that told me was this person and I suspect some  producers see only print as valuable and all other media as useless.  I am not going to pitch to a publication on a potential yes of a sample bottle and do that for wines that most likely won’t make any publications future printings.  C’est la Vin.

More wine news… next week!

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2019 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, graphs, photographs, logo, brand name, rating, rating, taxonomy, graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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This Week – February 3, 2019 – James Melendez

This weeks adventures were an experience of Sonoma County wines.

I had never been to Williams Selyem on Westside Road.  I had passed in front for years and didn’t realise that I had passed so often.  The winery is not marked except a street address listed on gate/fence area.  I, of course, have been tasting their wines for years.  It is not just a place to visit unless you are on the list.  Visit the site to see how you can get on the list.

The very nicely modern architecture of Alex Ceppi of D.arc Group was lead architect of this very handsome facility.  I had never tasted their San Benito County Pinot Noir from Vista Verde Vineyard and I had never tasted Williams Selyem Zinfandel – a very nice tasting new wines.  A nicely enjoyable visit and wondrous tasting of their wines.

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I was also delighted to visit Pedroncelli in Dry Creek Valley–I had visited but I had not been there in quite some time.  A rainy day is great day to visit this and all wineries.  Pedroncelli has been family owned and operated for 92 years.  If you are in Dry Creek Valley it is an outstandingly friendly place to visit and can be easily accessed on 101 if you are coming from or to the City.

I sat down and tasted through in a very civilized and relaxed manner with the always welcoming Ed St. John and Julie Pedroncelli St. John.  I also got to meet Dirk the Dog–a very cute and kind dog–Dirk the Big White Dog.  I appreciate the wines are certified sustainable and great care for all their wines and showcasing diversity of the rich estate wines that is Dry Creek Valley.  Pedroncelli has a thoughtful array of wines which include: Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Rose, Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Zinfandel, Sangiovese, Red Wine Blend, Petite Sirah and Vintage Port.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Come visit, no reservations required for the tasting room.  For additional tasting opportunities a reservation may be required.  Take a look at the web page to plan your desired experience.  Come as you are and enjoy Dry Creek Valley and Pedroncelli.

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This was a small but nice tasting of Wine Australia San Francisco tasting in Dog Patch at the Pearl.  This was organised by wine region versus produce hence wines could be on several tables.  A nice space and nice showing I felt when compared with the Australia Harvest Festival in 2005 at the Ferry Building there was a greater representation of producers.  While this was long, long ago in a galaxy quite far away it has stuck with me.  I do not believe there was another Australia Harvest Festival in SF after this point.  I do recall at the last Australia Harvest Festival that Chain of Ponds, Gala, Plantagenet, Sons of Eden, all Penfolds wines and Peter Lehmann were all there.

I love Australian wines and I do think there is a very wide open market for the US.  While Australia is often thought of for Shiraz it is quite diverse in it’s very strong presence of almost all commercially produce wine grapes.  Not just producing all commercial wine grapes–very strong producers.

Until next week–have a great week!

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2019 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, graphs, photographs, logo, brand name, rating, rating, taxonomy, graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Posted in Australia, Chardonnay, Dry Creek, Pinot Noir, Russian River, Sonoma County, Zinfandel | Leave a comment

A Stellar Evening of Wines from Saint-Émilion, Pomerol and Fronsac – James Melendez

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A lovely focus on the Right Bank of Bordeaux wines–emphasizing a Merlot with support of the other major red Bordeaux grapes.  I often taste Left Bank more often than Right Bank wines.  And to have this opportunity for beautiful Right Bank wines was a great learning experience and equally and tantalizing to taste with a delightful meal.

I love to eat at a nice restaurant but find it particularly special to have a chef prepared meal in a very nice setting.  This autumnal dinner was set in a very comfortable and well appointed home in San Francisco’s Castro District.  Plenty of comfort and elegance a la touch of mid-Century refinements.  No better way to frame an elegant dinner with this specific Bordeaux appellations of  Saint-Émilion, Pomerol and Fronsac.  This chef prepared meal was a nice offering of local foods and I am always tantalized by the beauty of the fresh herbs that were plentiful

Below is the menu which we enjoyed the wines with each specific dish.  Also listed below are the video reviews of most of the wines I tasted. Advanced sommelier Aubrey Terrazas guided the evening with information and thoughts on each wine presented with each course and taking about each of the appellations.

Château Clos du Roy Fronsac 2015

This wine is 95% Merlot and 5% Cabernet Franc.  SRP $19.00.  Nose and palate characterization in above video.

Food pairing: local cheese and charcuterie.

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Château Busquet Luscan Lusac-Saint-Émilion 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nose: elongated characteristics of Loch Ness Blackberry, cassis, dense forest, crushed autumnal leaves and spice rack.

Palate: Blackberry confit, clove-pepper, Thyme and Bay leaf.

Food Pairing: House smoked yellow tomatoes and Bolinas Bisque and oyster shooter with sweet Sherry Mignonette.

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Château La Dominique Saint-Émilion Grand Cru Classé 

Nose and palate characterization in above video.  This wine is a composition of Merlot, Cabernet sauvignon, and Cabernet Franc. I don’t have a tech sheet for this wine.

Food pairing: Shaved cauliflower and chicory salad, persimmon, hazelnuts, rosemary Manchego dressing.

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Château Lassègue Saint-Émilion Grand Cru 2014

This wine is 65% Merlot, 25% Cabernet Franc and 10% Cabernet Sauvignon.  SRP: $30.00.  Nose and palate characterization in above video.

Food pairing: Poulet Basquaise, late summer tomatoes, fire roasted smashed carrots.

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Château Lafleur-Gazin Pomerol 2014

This wine is 80% Merlot and 20% Cabernet Franc.  SRP: $47.00.  Nose and palate characterization in above video.

Food pairing: smoked Cumin crusted pork belly with Harissa butter and late summer Cassoulet

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Château Coutlet Saint-Émilion Grand Cru 2014

Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Malbec. (I didn’t have spec sheet for this particular wine hence I did not input the percentage of varieties).

Nose: Heirloom black-blue fruit, stacked dried wood, suede, and dried roses

Palate: blackberry, blueberry, red pepper, Cardamom and violets.

Food pairing:  Cardamom plum tart with Armanac soaked ice cream.  All of the dinner participant added color via a culinary torch to the plums and sugar in the tart – a very nice dessert to pair with Château Coutlet.  A lovely contrast of the deep dark brooding fruit in the wine with the caramelized sugar and Armanac note.

 

 

 

 

 

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Château Fombrauge Saint-Émilion Grand Cru 2012

This wine is 89% Merlot, 8% Cabernet Franc, 1% Cabernet Sauvignon and 2% Malbec. SRP $39.00.  Nose and palate characterization in above video.

Food pairing: I would pair steelhead trout, roasted salmon or pork loin.

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These wines are splendid on many levels.  Firstly, the value is fantastic – the least expensive wines is $19 and the most expensive $47.  I am frequently in Bordeaux variety country here in California and the average bottle price point is above $50 and now hovering in the $100 range.  I am asked often about Bordeaux in terms of pricing and there is a perception is that it significantly more expensive than it really is.  Secondly, while there are other places that have Bordeaux varieties: the dominant variety is Cabernet Sauvignon and, of course, you do find Merlot.  But there really is nothing quite like the tradition of the Right Bank–this particular groupings of subregions feature Merlot dominance with support of other Bordeaux varieties.  And thirdly, these wines are crafted beautifully with optimum fruit, age in the bottle and sophistication in the glass.

I hope you seek out these wines to enjoy with your next meal and see for yourself the beauty of Saint-Émilion, Pomerol and Fronsac–as your wine merchants for the above wines.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Wines and dinner courtesy of producers of  Saint Emilion, Pomerol-and Fronsac.

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2019 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, graphs, photographs, logo, brand name, rating, rating, taxonomy, graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Chateau La Dominque Grand Cru Classe 2013

Chateau La Fleur-Gazin

Château Lassègue Les Cadrans St. Emilion Grand Cru ’14

Chateau Busquet St. Emilion 2015

 

 

Posted in Bordeaux, Fronsac, Pomerol, Saint-Émilion | Leave a comment

This Week – January 27, 2019 – James Melendez

 

 

 

 

A very different week from last two weeks–busier than usual last week and hence no article.

This week I want to talk about recycling.  I am frequent diner and often take home left overs.  I cannot stand to see food go to waste.  I have also become much more conscious of the plastic I get when I bring something home–sometimes I get very nice high quality plastics.  These are the plastics that are not a one time use–they are superbly sturdy.  I talk about wine producers who are doing their part to be as earth kind as possible – so I need follow that line as well.  I didn’t suddenly start being earth friendly but have been doing so for a while–but I do believe in continuous improvement (CI) to keep my doing the right thing.

Not that long ago on an Italian beach I found a lot of plastics that have washed up shore.  These were in all shapes and sizes and I saw plastic pen covers…. yes, this is a good way to remind yourself that plastic just doesn’t disappear but linger around and harm the environment.  I thought this beach should have been immaculate.  It actual has lingered in my memory and made me sad.

Because I eat out often or even buy pre-made foods at my grocer I need to see what I can do retain plastics I get.  I have been conscious to clean and reuse again and again.  I started keeping plastic cleaning brushes for a longer period of time.  I wash these brushes to keep them usable.  I stopped buying plastic multi use store bags I instead use cloth.  While this bag is from plastic bottles – what happens when this wears out and there are holes in the bottom?  I place in recycle bin but does it actually get recycled–probably not.

This is a “recycled” shopping bag that perpetuates the plastic problem

I look at a variety of wine sustainability programmes like SIP Certified, Lodi Rules and Demeter to name a few that this is of big concern for producer and consumer alike.  But it is not just something that industry does but we should all play a part and there is plenty any one can do to make difference.

I hope to return to these specific beaches in Italy and find them immaculate and pristine in the future.  Consider keeping restaurant take away plastics and there will be plenty of opportunities to use them again when you create left overs from cooking.

I hope that I can ask for you to do the same!  Thank you!

Santé

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2019 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine GuyJames the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Posted in Environment, Sustainability, This Week | Leave a comment

Downgrading Crate & Barrel Calla Wine Glasses

I have never downgraded any wine glass review until now.  But I do think there is plenty of room for upgrading and downgrading of this essential element in wine tasting.  I am downgrading two of the three Calla wine glasses from Crate and Barrel based on performance.

I was initially excited by design and always hope for a wine glass to have a smart and relevant design and to be be well constructed at a handsome price.

But my disenchantment began with the Calla red wine glass.  The wine glass while a very forward design looks great but performs differently.  The glass finally broke which I expected–a quick and easy snapping at the stem which was unfortunate.  My experience with wine glasses is that they break from the stem or the rim (if cleaning is a bit too vigorous) easily and there are a few wine glasses styles that are pretty durable and don’t break that easily.  This red wine glass broke with relative ease.

The Calla red wine glass is too elongated and as I point out in the physics of it is rather unstable.  Swirl this glass and watch it move from side to side after you have let go.  I have never experienced this in any wine glass of wobbling after swirling.  It doesn’t look smart when your wine glass is moving long after you have touched it.  While not expensive $9.95 it is for me a wine glass that I wish I had not purchased because I could have bought another glass I did like.  I did dish wash but when compared to other wine glass it seemed to not perform as well as I expected–much more water staining.

I did like the sparkling wine glass a bit more.  There isn’t the same swirl issue as with the red wine glass.  I was looking for a more tulip shape at a reasonable price.  I love Zalto’s sparkling wine glasses but I didn’t want to pay $60+/stem for large events I might host.  The material of the glass itself obviously is not luxuriant as Zalto or other producers.  I downgraded this as the feel is not luxuriant and more utilitarian–like the red glass a lot more water staining than other sparkling wine glasses that I own.

What wine glasses do you like?

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2019 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, graphs, photographs, logo, brand name, rating, rating, taxonomy, graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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January 2019 Wine Reviews – James Melendez

It is only January and yet wine tasting for this month is filled with white and reds from Washington, California, German, Turkey and France.  So far in the beginning of the year is slow and I hope it will continue to be rich.

I continue to have a race track where I annualize tasting variety and also to making sure I am tasting a rich diversity of wines of place.  This is partly due to me asking to taste wines versus hoping something magically lands on my tasting table.  Magic is not a great recipe for a diverse tasting or actually anything else.

Looking forward to see what February will bring!

Santé,

James

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Romeo & Juliet Passione Sentimento Rosso Veneto IGT ’16

This wine is 40% Merlot, 30% Corvina, and 30% Croatina and 14% ABV

Nose of early season red cherry, raspberry, cedar, clove and rose petal.

Palate of cherry coulis, fennel, black pepper, and Thyme.

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Romeo & Juliet Passione Sentimento Bianco Veneto IGT ’17

This wine is 100% Garganega and 13% ABV.

Nose: Lemon curd, lemon and lime zest, almond, and flowers

Palate: Meyer Lemon peel, white stone fruit, oyster shell and almonds.

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Ancient Peak Paso Robles Santa Margarita Ranch Zinfandel ’16 

Nose of Tayberry, sweet cedar, suede and violets.

Palate of black cherry, bacon fat, pepper and allspice.

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Cairdeas Yakima Valley Marsanne ’17

Nose of yellow/green citrus zest and peel, white nectarine, flowers and moist stones.

Palate of green citrus curd, hint of almond and white stone fruit.

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Milbrandt Ancient Lakes Vineyards Chardonnay ’15 

Scent of dried Heirloom apple rings, green pear, nutmeg and oyster shell

Palate of green apple, white stone fruit, almond and minute hint of freshly ground nutmeg.

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Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2019 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, drawings, art work, graphs, photographs, logo, brand name, rating, rating, taxonomy, graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.  James the Wine Guy is also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Posted in Bordeaux, Champagne, Edna Valley, France, Germany, Napa Valley, Turkey, Washington State, Zinfandel | Leave a comment