Troon’s Tannat Wines 2014 Vintages – James Melendez

I love Oregon wines.  The state (California) which I currently resides touches the border of Oregon but they might as well be thousands of miles/kilometers apart.  Simply because wine lists have few Oregon wines and when they do 90% of the time they are from Willamette Valley.  It is a treat to find wines from Southern Oregon.

Southern Oregon where Troon is based has wines other than Burgundy varieties.  The richness of southern Oregon is a warmer climate able to support and thrive Bordeaux, Rhone, Italian and Iberian varieties.

I think these Tannat wines are the only Tannat I have ever tasted from Oregon.

I have previous vintages of these particular wines and here is what I am reviewing:

 Troon Southern Oregon M&T Red Wine 2014

Scent of blackberry bayberry, suede, underbrush, and sweet spices.  Flavour notes:  blackberry, red cherry, Hoisin, ground cinnamon and pepper.

Troon Applegate Valley Estate Tannat 2014

Scent of forest floor, cassis, Tayberry, pepper, and black cherry.  Flavour notes: black cherry, black berry, pepper, cinnamon and cardamom.

*******

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Wines courtesy of producer.

© 2017 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine GuyJames the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Travels and The Things You Do: How I Love Being on the Road But Often Dread Traveling Before I Go – James Melendez

Long title right?

Sometimes I have to give great details in my articles otherwise it is a decision point some people may choose not to read.

I love being in a new place but often dread travel. And it is more than just the anticipated travel difficulties… it is about looking at travel in terms of fatigue, delay, terrible food while en route. I am not unique in dreading such things. I also dread the stress of getting ready. I use to be a packer that was last minute—I would forget something… actually I would forget a lot of things.

Over time I have remedied my travels by having one suit case prepared—just in case I didn’t have a lot of time to prepare. I switch out suitcases that the clothes I have packed with a fresh set of clothes and keep the cycle going. My toiletries are not quite as in good shape. I just need to prepare a bag ahead of time—I sometimes forget essentials like a toothbrush or floss or something like it—this is easily remedied by keeping supplies segregated from home use.

Travel has changed and often we look at the negative; flight rules, weather, delayed flights, unfriendly or uncaring airlines. The good old days were necessarily good. I remember before Uber or Lyft I had to depend on a taxi or worse a Suppershuttle. The old taxi system was a dread…. I don’t miss the days of waiting to order, pleading for someone to come, waiting outside until they came. I remember on an East Coast flight all of the taxi services were not answering or they were not being responsive (and this before they accepted reservations?!?) I had to walk a block or two to hope to find an available taxi and back then that was stress… praying that you found an available taxi…..ah the good ole days.

Today with all of the trepidations of flying I have come to love one aspect.  While you can buy WiFi service—I always turn it down or if I am flying business I opt out.  Why?  It is great to be connected but it is a luxury to be disconnected.  I get more writing done than when I am plugged in.  I read more…..I might have a cramped seat but have been lucky on numerous occasions flying domestically that I have gotten the exit row on Southwest.   It is probably because I travel alone and I am fortunate.

Even with a painful delay—somehow just somehow it all works itself out for me getting time to do things I love to do.  To find time to write is a luxury…..to read I rarely even have enough time to read a New Yorker article.

I have been fortunate while traveling—and like everyone else have received a healthy dose of difficulty but the upper road is to look skyward…. Being hopeful, appreciating time—having the time to appreciate time.  So when I dread the next trip or I would rather stay in my home base I have to remember my great experiences.  I wish you great experiences while traveling!

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Wines courtesy of producer.

© 2017 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine GuyJames the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Yelp and TripAdvisor Reviews – James Melendez

I use to be a heavy contributor to both Yelp and TripAdvisor. I was a Yelp Elite for 10 years in a row. I was disappointed when I was not approved and was told that could change through the year that I was not immediately accepted but that did not happen. I did go to the Yelp Elite events and I enjoyed them. I was disappointed that after my years of heavy contributions it didn’t matter much.

I get reminders from TripAdvisor that I am in the top “X” percent. Yeah good for them. I am not sure why I need to contribute more…. There is not benefit or incentive. After all both Yelp and TripAdvisor are publicly held companies and their business model is dependent on a lot of free work.

I have left my accounts open but will I contribute –I do reserve for myself the right to contribute on my terms and not theirs. I find TripAdvisor to be an overly perfectionist model of crowd sourced reviews. If I want to make a correction I have to erase, resubmit and wait till it is “approved.”

I would rather contribute to my own blog sites than to another site where the credit I get is marginal at best and that I think is truly not valued.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Wines courtesy of producer.

© 2017 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine GuyJames the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Southern Italian Wines in Lock Step of Continuous Discovery – James Melendez

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I love southern Italian wines–they are just as varied and complex and beautiful as anything in Northern Italy.  Italy is a country that has a marvelous history and where each region is distinct and memorable–food, wine, history and art.

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In Locorotondo

I remember when I was at the Fancy Food Show in New York over a decade ago.  As always I have appointments or just running round to see each aspect of the show–this show was not exception.  This show I slowed down when it came to the Italian Pavillion and there was a seminar put on by Radici del Sud–from that point forward I was in love with the mission of showcasing southern Italian wines.  I tasted Negroamaro and octopus–and who knew this could be so sublime.   Negroamaro– a wine meaning black from bitter is more earthy and tart than bitter.   I had tasted Primitivo many times before but it is always wonderful to taste the Italian expression simply because both region and style come through in ways that it is not Zinfandel.  What I mean by this is that many producers in California are using Petite Sirah-nothing wrong with that but it is highly influential and I say there is a point of departure where these wines can no longer compared against to each other for many reasons.  

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Southern Italian wines have been shining through more now than ever.  There are certainly a ‘country to be discovered” Southern Italy is discovered but discovery is still happening.  I am happy to have been a judge at Radici del Sud 2016.  I remember getting the invitation and I had to re-read again and again–it was a dream to be in Puglia once again.

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Gallipoli

Radici is essential to tell the story of the southern Italian wines.  I loved tasting the treasury of Aglianico–there is so many Aglianico in Italy and much fewer in North America.  Aglianico is certainly a noble red wine of the south.

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Bari Duomo

I am eager to taste more Fiano, Nerello Mascalese, Cataratto, Gagiliopo, Nero d’Avola, Nero di Troia, Malvasia Bianca, Verdeca, Greco di Tuffo, Grillo, Falanghina, Vermentino, Susumaniello, Pallagrello Nero and Pallagrello Bianco.  I do think that we will be tasting more wines from Southern Italy in North America–I do think it is about having vino veritas come to the forefront of dazzling wines to pair with food.

I was so delighted to participate in Radici and I am so glad to go back to participate in Sicilia en Primeur 2017.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Wines courtesy of producer.

© 2017 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine GuyJames the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Wine and Basel B Chocolates – James Melendez

I love beautiful things and especially if they have a dynamic flavour.  I know that I am not unusual in being an appreciator of the finer things in life.  But it is hard to find fine art and food united together.

Wine, great food, art, clothes, furniture and travel goes hand in hand.  Sometimes things intersect; Basel B Chocolates certainly intersect exquisite art and fine food.  The intersection is a passion of culinary artist Basel Bazalmit has developed a brand that encompasses the physical beauty with the compelling flavour characteristics.  I love that when I eat a chocolate with wine – it is a great experience of the truffle–a compelling 85% Columbian dark chocolate with the wonderful crunch and dynamics of the chocolate.  I eat a truffle to compliment my wine journey.  I eat a truffle to match and marry with wine and give the proverbial hand shake… no proverbial hug.  There are few unique truffles on the market place and having had a grand tour of year last year (2016) I was tasting many chocolate truffles.  While many had beauty on the inside it lacked an appreciable appearance or vice versa.

Basel B. Chocolate Truffles

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I eat chocolate the way I drink my wine–with great appreciation and not doing so in terms of consuming a massive quantity of one or the other but to enjoy in moderation to gain insight into my wine and chocolate journey.

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basel-b-truffle-flavours

Basel B Truffle Flavours

 

I love the vividness of each flavour – the Holiday Spice is an evocative and sweetly spiced truffle, the Blueberry is a definitively rich flavour and handsome snapshot of the fruit, the Caramel and Hazelnut is a thrilling combination of flavours of rich caramel and further elevated by the earthly sweetness of the hazelnut.

My luxury is to enjoy one or two with a glass of wine.  I am fully satiated when I just a few to be my after meal experience (i.e. dessert) with either a full bodied red or a Madeira, Port or Sherry.

I do plan on a doing a video and compare the chocolates with the wines I will be pairing with his truffle flavours.  A par excellence experience that I recommend to everyone.

Basel at the 2017 Winter Fancy Food Show - San Francisco

Basel at the 2017 Winter Fancy Food Show – San Francisco

 

Here is information on his chocolates – currently available online:

Basel B Chocolates

And he will be exhibiting at the San Francisco Chocolate Salon on March 18, 2017.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Wines courtesy of producer.

© 2017 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine GuyJames the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Locations I and P 4 Wines – James Melendez

I recently tasted these two locations wines:

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Locations I Wine 4 NV 

9.0

This is a composition of Negroamaro, Nero d’Avola and Barbera from Italy.

Scent characteristics: blackberry, cassis, leather, fruit orchard during autumn, and dates.

Flavor characteristics: Black cherry, earth, red pepper, Tamarind, and Thyme.

 

Locations P Wine 4 NV

9.0This wine is a composition of Touriga Naçional, Trincadeira and Touriga Franca

Scent characteristics: Red cherry, under brush, bay leaf, violets and cinnamon

Flavor characteristics: Black cherry, red plum, pepper, cardamom and clove

Wine courtesy of producer.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Wines courtesy of producer.

© 2017 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine GuyJames the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Kaizen and Champagne – James Melendez

kaizen

Gallimard Père & Fils Vineyard in Les Richey

Kaizen loosely transliterated means ‘improvement’ or the literal transliteration is ‘change for better’ from the Japanese.

I have been in the business world for quite some time and have found a fondness for Kaizen…. Who has ever said Kaizen and fondness in one breath?  Champagne of course—Kaizen well…maybe just me.  I have never seen an article about Kaizen and Champagne.  And I can think of no more ideal wine region where the subject of Kaizen hand-in-hand.  Actually no other product demonstrates Kaizen so well.

I need to pair together the concept of Kaizen and Champagne.  Kaizen has always been exercised in Champagne even if the term had not been invented; proof of concept it it’s most tangible form is the history of Champagne.

We can look at Venetian shipmakers who have been 5S* methodology producing ships five century ago.  If I look at the Operational Excellence or Business Process Excellence (BPE) I think of terms like Lean, Lean Six Sigma, Six Sigma, 5S, and Kaizen to name a few concepts and methodologies.  The 20th Century was not just about scientific management but management by objective and quality.  Toyota, Motorola and General Electric have been big promoters of some variant of Business Process Excellence and I should add many other companies have looked to BPE to define, innovate, maintain and improve business processes and operations.

Champagne is certainly a great example of Kaizen.   And while Kaizen is one of Champagne’s secret sauce there is a pure, core and unadulterated vision and belief in making Champagne not just a marginal wine region but one of world-class wines.

Kaizen is about incremental improvement; small steps that in the long run demonstrate a remarkable difference.  Now the word innovation can be talked about when bring up the subject of Kaizen.  Innovation is a movement that is both remarkable and very disruptive—innovation is a singular act, product, process or idea that has a significant impact and is seen as a positive contribution.  Some things in Champagne can be covered by a blanket statement of innovation but innovation is a rare event—more common and realistic is to hone in on improvements bit-by-bit hence Kaizen.

I am not going to belabor (because it has been told many times before) the long history of incremental improvements in Champagne but I’ll start with Reims.  A city that is known as the place where France’s kings were always crowned did not have a wine fitting for a regent.  The Champagnoise were longing for the wine excellence for the kings of France—looking to it’s neighbour is Burgundy.  Burgundy has been producing wines of excellence for a very long time—the path of incremental improvements was fewer for Burgundy then Champagne.  The climate is Burgundy friends and Champagne’s foe.

The story begins with the pesky bubbles—the process of double fermentation was not known and, of course, not known how to stop it.  Alas the climate and storage of wines created the double fermentation state.  The bubbles were not what the Champagnoise envisioned because this was to create a comparable wine and after all the grapes were similar sans Pinot Meunier.

Lets start with Dom Pérignon and I’ll make it simple with some foundational bookends of the Dom and Madame Clicquot.  Pérignon did not invent Champagne just helped to start developing this regions wines.  His goal was to stop the bubbles alas he could not stop but he made some important foundational contributions.

I am capturing the incremental improvements and in no particular order and this is a contribution made by Dom Perignon and Madame Clicquot and others:

• Pruning

• Wine grapes utilized – his preference was for Pinot Noir above other grapes

• Improved clarification of wines

• Blending wines

• Corks that could withstand 3 atmospheres of pressure

• Bottle design and strength (which has been further refined today to reduce carbon footprint)

• Riddling

• Secondary fermentation

• Dosage

• Classifiying sugar levels

o Brut Nature

o Extra Brut

o Brut

o Extra Dry

o Demi-Sec

o Doux

• Styles:

o Blanc de Blancs

o Brut Rose

o Brut

o Blanc de Noirs

• Organizing body: The Comité Champagne

• The allowed grapes

o Most common: Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Meunier (also known as Pinot Meunier)

o Less common: Arbane, Petit Meslier, Pinot Blanc (Vrai Blanc) and Pinot Gris

We needed multiple of improvements and we could not have had one singular innovator—even Dom Perignon would have tried to eliminate bubbles… Imagine Champagne as a still wine? The desire to remove the bubbles was to remove what was thought of to be a flaw instead of an asset. …. A good thing that he failed at that and a good thing Kaizen helped to progress this wine to the bubbly state we know today. Input of many people and, of course, Dom Perignon and Madame Cliquot is evidence of Kaizen in action and that time which Kaizen requires can make an ideal state.

_____________

*5S is a a workplace methodology in Japanese: Seiri – Sort, Seiton – Set in Order, Seiso – Shine, Seiketsu – standardize, and Shitsuke – sustain.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Wines courtesy of producer.

© 2017 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine GuyJames the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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San Francisco’s Quick Sand of Retail and Restaurant Landscape Space

San Francisco is a town that has a gotten it’s food game on more than ever. I worked with someone who always said to me that San Francisco has the country’s best restaurants which I would chime in and say “except New York.” Food has been good but it the scene has been getting better over time.

The exception to this compliment is that San Franciscans are not loyal to restaurants—not the way New Yorkers are ….. New York has 21 and Le Grenouille San Francisco has …. Let me stretch… Tadich and Swan Oyster Depot and they are good restaurant but they are no 21. New York like other cities does cycle out of restaurants like anywhere but I think they give it a longer run. Look at Lutece, Four Seasons (breaks my heart that it is not with us) to name a few.

And I am aware that New Yorkers are surprised and feel there are many more resturant closures than usual. I feel, at least, for San Francisco is that the restaurant lifespan is decreasing and not for organic reason but for purely speculative ones. San Francisco on a per capita basis has one of the largest percentages of millionaires than even New York. Even with great wealth doesn’t mean that restaurants can afford to stick around for things to improve (and absurd thought as things are robust economically now). It is a simple equation of how many plates do you have to serve to pay the rent let alone the food costs and other business supporting costs. San Francisco commercial landlords do not have a skin in the game for the long term and think the highest price per square foot is appealing.

Even with great wealth —not everyone can afford an everyday lunch salad of $20…. And just because there is great wealth doesn’t mean there are great tastes behind it. Also because there is a large of upwardly mobile doesn’t mean they are always here in San Francisco to eat in a restaurant; after all people travel for business often.

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A favourite restaurant of mine just ceased operation – Range. Range took the space of a Tapas restaurant called Timo’s and closed after 12 years of operation. It was my neighbourhood restaurant. We both arrived in the neighbourhood around the same time (thought I have been here slightly longer). I was delighted that a sit down restaurant had opened up in such a tiny space. A great place for a romantic dinner and a rare place even by San Francisco standards where you could hear your dinner mate—no yelling was required. The neighbourhood still needs a sit down restaurant. Also the closure of Bar Tartine was another heartbreak. The loss of Bar Tartine is of note. I loved the point of difference was the Eastern European cuisine. San Francisco is a desert for almost any Eastern European cuisine. The closure of Old Krakow in West Portal ended any Polish cuisine in San Francisco.

I was surprised to hear that AQ, even Show Dogs had closed (amazing curry fried chicken sandwich), Volta, Umami, Kuletos, Ame, Bourbon Steak, Bon Marche, and Lulu. When Dennis Leary’s Canteen closed (a few years ago) I was so saddened. So charming and fitting for the neighbourhood. Intimate with just a few tables of chef prepared food. Books on the wall to reflect the personality of Chef Leary. I felt like it certainly San Francisco most under-rated restaurant. I also felt like this is a restaurant Dashiel Hammet would have frequented if he had lived her while Canteen was open. Dennis Leary doesn’t have a sit down restaurant in his mainly lunch and drinks establishments. I think we are missing out on his amazing culinary style.

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I look at Valencia Street area it has a rough year. It is a vibrant street with lots of foot traffic. But it showed me renamed speculation alley.   Just recently, Fine Arts Optical relocated to Berkeley, Ruby store on 20th near Valencia Street (closing after more than a decade and half) a cute gift store with jewelry and women’s clothing—when I first moved to the area Ruby had been an organizer of helping to bring together 20th Street with a few years of organizing and sponsoring of a block party for the street.

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Gingko Furniture on Valencia is closing and the gallery Campfire just recently closed on 24th Street between Valencia and Mission Streets.

This is what one might expect to see during a recession not during a 3.4% employment rate.

Even the luxury retailer have thrown in the towel—Prada, DeBeers and Giorgio Armani which I thought would always be here have given up.

San Francisco aggressive store front real estate needs to come back down to earth and think of the long haul versus the short term circus we are currently in.

San Francisco in general has lost it’s soul during this economic cycle. The only concern of Mayor Lee is for two things only 1) condos 2) office space and has shown little interest in open space, exhibition space (the Exhibition Center on 9th Street could have been rebuilt with exhibition space on the bottom and condominium on top). San Francisco artist community has been decimated and it take leadership of a visionary in City Hall that can advocate for quality of life and a richer offering of venues for activities.

Wine events have decreased in San Francisco over time not because there is a lessened interest but because event space is decreasing rapidly.

I look forward to a new leader in City Hall and I hope the city’s retail space and restaurant real estate can come back to earth to help sustain the reason people want to live and visit here.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Wines courtesy of producer.

© 2017 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine GuyJames the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Two 2015 Rias Baixas Albariño – James Melendez

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9.2

La Val Rias Baixas Albariño 2015

Scent characterisation:  mineral, white stone fruit, and orange blossom and flavour characterisation white peach, apricot, almond and white tea.

9.2

Maior de Mendoza Rias Baixas Fulgent Albariño 2015

Scent characterisation: green citrus, white tea, sesame, and white flowers and flavour characterisation  verbena, golden citrus, pine nut, and tea

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Wines courtesy of producer.

© 2017 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine GuyJames the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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My Fourth Quarter France Food Adventure – A Renewed Love for French Food – James Melendez

I always look longingly to go back to France.  I was in France for the Champagne Harvest tour in September.  I miss France and the food never disappoints.  I am both excited by the farmers markets which always encompass beautiful displays of cheese and fish.  I was glad that I was staying at an AirBNB to enjoy charcuterie, cheese and wine.

I can compare and contrast fine food in the Bay Area and in many ways it is rarefied in most parts of the American experience.  I think the abundance of food is not just evident it is easily experienced on a casual walk in central Paris.  I was there with a friend and he was there to experience the chocolate since he is a professional chocolatier.  I was there on a mission to see the grape harvest in Champagne and enjoy a few days in Paris.

The food hall at Galleries Lafayatte has it’s own building–the old food hall was in the upper floors of the boulevard Haussmann store.  The food hall (diagonal of it’s original location) is glorious and has been further refined.  I arrive just in time to have food at the Spanish food bar.  I thought should I be eating Spanish food in France?  The food was superbly fresh and loved each morsel and it was a great homage to Spanish cuisine.  I loved the Octopus.

San Francisco doesn’t really have a food hall.  The closest might be the Ferry building but that is not a cohesive setting–it is a group of vendors.  The cohesiveness of a Grand Magasin like Lafayette is a goal of completeness — not exhaustiveness but to have a wide range of foods available.

I think French food culture is just as alive and is a world heritage country to preserve the fineness of food culture.  Traditional French cuisine has often been thought of as too heavy—too high in fat–too something.  But the French cookery is too ingrained into not just the French but a world dependent on tradition.  The French cookery has been under many influences such as Haute cuisine or Nouvelle–but ultimately what is important is the general heading of French cuisine.

I was delighted with the recent opening of Restaurant Racine in Reims the cuisine style is French with a Japanese accent.  Freshness and delicateness headline this experience–especially on my long journey to Paris then Reims –this meal could not have been more special and perfect for the recent long sprint.

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Restaurant Racine - Racine meaning root proves a great fundamental name to this wondrous presentation and food.

Restaurant Racine

8 Rue Colbert,

51100 Reims, France

*****

Another great and such a perfect place to eat especially during the relative warmth of a Champagne autumn is Les Avisés.  Les Avisés is a very small hotel and restaurant at the Domaine of Jacques Selesse.

Eating outdoors and enjoying the freshest produce along not just beautiful plated food but food that is a shining example of food excellence in Champagne.

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While this is at the Domaine of Jacques Selosse which I recommend ordering his wines here as such a special touch to your food experience.  If you don’t order Selosse wines the wine list is fantastic of both RM and NM wines.   I got to walk Jacques cellar–small and storied–I wish I could have chatted with Jacques a bit but it was harvest time after all.

Les Avisés

Hôtel Restaurant Les Avisés –

59, rue de Cramant – 51190 Avize

*****

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Frenchie

5 Rue du Nil,

75002 Paris, France

I loved my tasting menu at Frenchie.  Frenchie is something I thought for certain we wouldn’t get into.  I approached the restaurant and made an inquiry and of course they had no reservation.  The next idea was to line up at their wine bar and eat there.  Not a bad alternative.  Then a few minutes later Maître d’ finds me and my friend Basel in line and says “good news, there is a cancellation…would you like to come over.” So welcoming and warm and very casual.

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Duck

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Sorbet

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Heirloom Tomato

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Chocolate

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*****

Porte 12 is another tasting menu experience–a very beautiful and simplified approach.  What I loved about this tasting menu is the minimalism and the experience was harmonious notes accented with fresh and focused notes.  And I had the best chocolate dessert of all time–like a Pot de Creme with dark chocolate dust.

Porte 12

12 Rue des Messageries

75010 Paris, France

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Country Egg

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Smoked Beans

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Langostino

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Rabbit Loin – one of the most delightful dishes I have ever tasted.

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Cheese Plate

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The Most Amazing Chocolate Dessert of All Time – Like a Chocolate Powder–pure delight.

 

These were just a few of the spectacular meals I had in France.  I will write up more of Champagne visits and the foods I had along the way.

I find food in San Francisco to have changed and upgraded over time.  And yet I still miss the food in France.  Always spectacular and even with Euro to Dollar exchange rate to be completely reasonable.  Every meal was memorable and I loved everything I ate.  And this is why I take pictures of food–never ashamed to take food photos at the dining table.

I hope to go back to France this year.

Santé,

James

James the Wine Guy

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

© 2017 James Melendez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine GuyJames the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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