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Month July 2015

General Overview of Wine Varieties Series on My YouTube Channels – James Melendez

Being a large creator of video and written content it is hard to keep track of it all.  I do revisit the topics that I have published.  I thought it important to highlight the videos that I created as it relates to a general education on specific wine grape varieties.  In general I don’t watch my videos after I review before publishing–I like most people in video don’t want to see themselves again for a lot of reasons.  However, I did look at the General Overview of Pinot Noir (Long Version) I noted that I created a 10 minute video in one take–no editing!?  Well in the old days–just a few ago I would film my videos over and over until I found I didn’t need to edit.  But the technique of perfect taping is very hard and extremely time consuming.  I found that I have had plenty of content and it was time for the big “E” editing to save time and after reviewing videos most people on YouTube edit their content for optimum viewing.

I covered a lot of well known varieties (Bordeaux, Rhône) and a few that are still relatively not common (Juhfark, Rkatsiteli, etc.).   I have more general overview videos to make.

Here are all my videos in the General Overview series (32).

Take a look.

Thank you!

James

 

Salud!

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Read more of my wine reviews:   WORDPRESS

© 2015 James Meléndez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.

James the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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526 Million Reasons PA House Bill 466 was Vetoed

Prohibition (or the continuous effect of post-prohibition) is still alive and kicking in Pennsylvania and especially with Governor Tom Wolf at the helm.  Governor Wolf vetoed House Bill 466 because as it says on his website “In the most recent case of another state that pursued the outright privatization of liquor sales, consumers saw higher prices and less selection.”  I am not so sure this governor or even a governor is completely concerned about wine, beer and spirits pricing for their citizens.  And I am not sure any governor cares about their public have a lesser selection.  Living in California where private off-premise establishments have demonstrated a considerable assortment in that if you don’t find what you are seeking at one retailer might be available at another. And California is not the only US state to have privately run stores where competition is thriving and is the norm.  Competition is quite effective in keeping pricing down and selection optimized.  State run stores quite often only feature larger producers–bowing only slightly to smaller producers to show a fuller assortment but truly don’t have the interest or call to reach to a larger set of smaller producers.

I remember one memorable meal I had in Philadelphia only a couple of years ago.  I wanted to sit down and enjoy a nice lunch but when I asked for a glass of wine I was pointed to go to that corner and order from the state run store.  So going over to the state run store to order a 375 ml bottle there was very little choice–I could only order by the bottle not by the glass.  I didn’t want a whole bottle 750 ml so my choice was drastically limited and the awkwardness of simultaneously ordering my food and then stepping away from my table to get my wine was something I contemplated giving up and chalking it up to ‘only in Pennsylvania’.

Looking at Governor Tom Wolf’s statement I looked at Washington state because that is his reference point; when Washington privatized liquor sales it also took a sharp northerly turn as it relates to liquor taxes (some of the highest in the US and Washington has traditionally always has had a very high general sales tax).  But I looked at one particular product which shows two things–great variability in pricing across each of the fifty states but also shows great competitive forces especially during holiday times.  Veuve Clicquot both a darling and demon for the off-premise community–easy(ier) to sell than most Champagnes (often sells itself whereas another brand perhaps lesser known takes a greater effort to hand sell) a demon because the competitive forces especially during holiday time drag margins way down–sometimes to low single digits. Pricing for Cliquot at state run stores in Pennsylvania that I saw on their website is $49.99 and in Arizona at Total Wine is $41.97 (same size) some 16% percent cheaper in Arizona.

Governor Wolf also mentions “It makes bad business sense for the Commonwealth and consumers to sell off an asset, especially before maximizing its value” Does this mean expansion of Pennsylvania’s chain of stores? Drive higher margins?  Creating operational efficiencies and/or increasing share of market pie for liquor sales in Pennsylvania?   There is very little clarity to this statement–it would nice to know what Wolf means by this.  Ultimately, Governor Wolf has $526 million reasons (2014 net profit from the Commonwealth’s wine and spirits retail empire)  to never privatize liquor in Pennsyvlania.  While the legislature agreed to privatization Wolf did not.  I am not sure there will be a time in the future that everything aligns for this this to ever happen in the Commonwealth.  There is only a great disincentive to privatize and Pennsylvania does not have the willpower to kick the bottle.

Salud!

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Read more of my wine reviews:   WORDPRESS

© 2015 James Meléndez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.

James the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Another Milestone for James the Wine Guy on YouTube – James Melendez

I have reached over 200,000 views today (7-July-2015).  I see this on my backend metrics and you will see this in a few days on your public view of my channel; there is a lag and I am not sure why that lag exists.

More importantly reaching over 200,000 views in the wine category on YouTube is very hard to achieve.   Wine does not match spirits or beer or food for that matter in terms of click rate.  The Audience is not ‘Listening” to Wine Videos on YouTube…Yet is an article I wrote talking about improvements for content for wine videos.  I believe there is an audience but has not found the content they are seeking on YouTube.  Also audiences are seeking a high quality content.  And then a unique feature that wine has that beer or spirits doesn’t have; significantly larger number of labels as well as something called vintage.  Also, there are so many wine labels produced each year that only a very small fraction are covered on YouTube.  Very important in that if one searches for two or three bottles they would like more information one–likely that content does not exist.

I think there is a problem with many people starting wine vlogs/video is that they abandon their channels.  They abandon their channels because of low click rates but that is unfortunate as I think most video producers have low(er) click rates and the necessary ingredient that few producers recognize is the need to build a community.  There is a big void on quality wine content and that doesn’t mean there aren’t good producers of wine video content–it means there are only a handful of producers covering a very gigantic category.  Some wine video producers do well because they have a name coming from the print world – Jancis Robinson.  Ironically, Jancis Robinson has a video on YouTube entitled  “Jancis wonders how wine is best tackled on video” and she express doubt by saying she was “slightly put off by the standard format” of wine videos.  While Jancis says that wine is not a spectator sport–I have looked at the beer, spirits, even the coffee and tea world as being successful in that approach and perhaps this could be helpful for wine.

From what I have seen of her videos–she has a tow deep in the YouTube world but I think her commitment is print.  She has 230,000 total channel clicks–I have 30,000 more to catch up.  I think the miss is to not recognize what YouTube is in terms of social media.  YouTube has been influential and taking market share of all traditional broadcast media channels in the US.  YouTube has been a great phenomenon of how people communicate and express themselves.  If wine is viewed not just as an object but as a subject this will attract a greater following.

Gary Vaynerchuk, the now retired darling of the wine world, made appealing content that helped to make him widely recognized vlogger.  His approach was unorothordox and I am sure his demo was a segment that skewed perhaps drinking age to mid-30s, male, New York Jets fans who liked wine.  I remember stumbling on his channel and his click rate was small and in some videos today small when compared with some producers of beer and Scotch videos.  But what made Gary more visible and successful is that he worked to make a community of viewers not just a random act of viewing.

While Gary was very successful as a wine vlogger I do think his demo’s didn’t cover everyone.  And, in fact, wine in itself does not have category killers as it relates to wine video producers.  I don’t think any one person can do that.  But that is good news for the rest of us.  As there is a need for more producers of wine video content.

Back to me; I have seen content types that I won’t repeat like videos of wine events, no one wants to see a wine event happened that they are not attending.  When I am at a group setting video someone talking about their wines.  I much prefer to do a video with that person especially in interview format.  I have found trying to collaborate with other people hard to do because there are many people who don’t want to make or be in a video.  But I am still interested in this format.

I do look forward to making more wine video content and to continue to build a community.  So stayed tuned for more and thank you for watching my videos on YouTube!

Salud!

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Read more of my wine reviews:   WORDPRESS

© 2015 James Meléndez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved – for my original Content, logo, brand name, rating, rating graphic and award and designs of James the Wine Guy.

James the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

Follow, subscribe, like, browse:

TWITTERFACEBOOKGOOGLE+VIMEOLINKEDFLICKRpinterestWordpressYOUTUBETUMBLR