February 2013
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Month February 2013

Delamotte Champagne Blanc de Blancs Brut – 2002 – 9.6 – James Meléndez / James the Wine Guy

9.6

Dazzling wine; excellence in Champagne–absolutely complex, delicate, nuanced and full of character.

Notes of biscuit, Quince, exotic green citrus, warm almond, and Cardamom.

¡Salud!

http://www.jamesthewineguy.com

***

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

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S. A. Prüm Wehlener Sonnenuhr Trockenbeerenauslese – 2005 – 9.8 – James Meléndez / James the Wine Guy

 

 

9.8Prum TBA

This is the first wine I have ever rated at 9.8 (98) and I have been and will always be conservative in how I view and rate wine.

This is a wine with considerable finesse, dense and yet nuanced, a finely sculpted wine that can be served at dessert as dessert.

Though I would recommend cheese–a blue cheese would be optimum in my opinion but if there is no blue cheese then your favourite cheese.  There are very few bottles of TBA that exist anywhere at any given time.  And it is a treasure to partake in these rare moments.  I have been fortunate to taste several.

This wine presents with a dark gold treasure chest hue; a successful Trockenbeerenauslese is a myriad of notes but the taste experience that is satisfying one sip at a time–nothing else is missing–nothing else is needed.  Notes of truffled wild flower honey, fleshy winter pear, Spitzenberg apple, autumnal baking spice, honeysuckle and the ever and almost non-detectable note of Calla Lily.

 ¡Salud!

http://www.jamesthewineguy.com

***

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Read more of my wine reviews:

© 2013 James Meléndez / Jaime Patricio Meléndez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved. James the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Wine v. Beer Videos – James Meléndez / James the Wine Guy

Randomly look for almost any video on beer on YouTube and you will begin to notice immediately is how popular beer videos are–in fact–look at the aggregate of video views and it can be common to see 800,000 or a million hits… then compare with wine videos–2,000 here 50,000 there.

This isn’t a contest but where wine videos will go.  I have 1,154 videos–not because they are easy to do or take no time to complete–on the contrary they take a lot of time to complete.  I do believe that the wine video has not been discovered by the masses at this time.  It is a matter of time.  Someone who produced a 1,000 gave up.  But probably because their counts weren’t high enough.  Wine unlike beer at least in the social media frame is heavily dependent on the written.  I have compared my written to video form and the video form is often outpacing any written piece.

Eventually the wine consuming public wouldn’t look to hope to find content that matches their needs but will expect to see content on every wine they are interested in.

My video on Ruffino Riserva Ducale Chianti Classico Riserva – 2007 – 9.0 – James Meléndez / James the Wine Guy is not my oldest video and yet it is the first to crest the 2,000 video view mark–and that is simply because it is is very widely distributed.

The wine video frontier is still a frontier soon to marry up with a larger audience.  Stay tuned.. there is more to come.

 ¡Salud!

http://www.jamesthewineguy.com

***

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Read more of my wine reviews:

© 2013 James Meléndez / Jaime Patricio Meléndez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved. James the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Castello di Amorosa La Castellana Napa Valley Red Wine – 2008 – 9.2 – James Meléndez

9.2

This Super Tuscan blend via Napa Valley is  66% Cabernet Sauvignon, 18% Merlot and 16% Sangiovese–the name La Castellana is the wife of the Lord & master of a castle.

Scent of cedar wood pile, tangled wood, forest floor, dried leaves and leather

Flavour notes of blueberry inter mixing with red and black cherry, black plum, fennel, black pepper, toffee and dried marjoram, Cardamom and cinnamon.

 ¡Salud!

http://www.jamesthewineguy.com

***

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Read more of my wine reviews:

© 2013 James Meléndez / Jaime Patricio Meléndez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved. James the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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The Beverage Arts in Portland – James Meléndez / James the Wine Guy

Deschuttes

While Portland is a capital of beer–might I add world capital of beer—I do think surface has yet been completely scratched as it relates to urban wineries and distilleries.  Distilleries, ironically, out numbering urban wineries by a wide margin.  Portland’s many breweries have placed it as the brewing capital of the world–outpacing and out placing Brussels.  And even with breweries I doubt we have seen the limit.

And more artisan focused beers is a national craving that still needs to be feed.  For a period of time it was only people in certain urban centers who had this craving.  Artisan distilling is quite viable as many people are seeking new interpretations on gin, vodka and whiskey and other spirits.  Visiting a couple of distilleries made me a believer is very small batch production.  The price points didn’t have an artisan price point—very reasonable and a comfortable fit.

Portland, a very short drive from Willamette Valley producers has fewer urban wineries than I would expect.  But to be fair–San Francisco has very few with respect to the nearby wine countries of Napa, Sonoma, and Livermore Valley.  Portland is the epicenter of Pacific Northwest wine as not only is Willamette nearby so are the Washington wine countries just across the Columbia.  Also, in  Northeast Oregon as the Columbia Valley, Columbia Gorge and Snake Valley wine countries.  Enso Winery is the only urban winery that I have visited and has an allotment of wines from Willamette Valley and Horse Heaven Hills.  Enso Winery was packed when I was there (on a recent food and wine tour of Portland).  I would expect more urban wineries to open up in the future—and unlike San Francisco where street level real estate is as rarified as the Dodo–Portland has many more possibilities.  Possibility is an asset and the food scene in Portland is wonderfully developed.  Let me be more clear–since Portland has this scene–I could only expect this to be even more developed in the future

Portland, unlike the fictional show Portlandia, is accessible on many levels–it is easy to get around on public transport and where else could you visit a distillery using a city bus–well…very few… and might I add that bus stop is practically at the door of House Spirits.   And I do like Portland’s friendliness; it is quite noticeable.

I do love Portland as a base camp for so many wine countries, evocative hillsides, and the ever present Douglas fir create a signature that is romantic.  I do like Portland’s view of coffee just as lively as any Pacific coast city.  Portland is a great place for your next culinary and beverage tour.

 ¡Salud!

http://www.jamesthewineguy.com

***

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Read more of my wine reviews:

© 2013 James Meléndez / Jaime Patricio Meléndez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved. James the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Bergström Cumberland Reserve Willamette Valley Pinot Noir – 2011 – 9.3 – James Melendez / James the Wine Guy

9.3

Dense, lush Pinot Noir, exhibiting a continuous and nuanced spice tone.

Exhibiting characteristics of Marionberry, blueberry, hint of game, smoke, fennel, cardamom and rose petal.

¡Salud!

http://www.jamesthewineguy.com

***

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Read more of my wine reviews:

© 2013 James Meléndez / Jaime Patricio Meléndez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved. James the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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Miraflores El Dorado Zinfandel – 2005 – 9.4 – James Melendez / James the Wine Guy

Noticeably aromatic–definitively Zinfandel. Something about this growing region produces nicely dark Zinfandels; notes of wild blueberry, Marionberry, lavender, delicate hint of rose petal, slight hint of cinnamon stick, nutmeg, and Cardamom.

¡Salud!

http://www.jamesthewineguy.com

***

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Read more of my wine reviews:

© 2013 James Meléndez / Jaime Patricio Meléndez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved. James the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

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International Wines – The New Interpretation to Come – James Melendez / James the Wine Guy

Without question when international varieties is mentioned — the fast forward button goes to wine grape varieties from well known French regions i.e. Bordeaux, Burgundy, Rhône.  But these internationalizing wines in some ways say these specific varieties are a well pedigreed grape that can underscore native or indigenous varieties

Go to any wine seminar anywhere and you will hear something like… “while there are native or indigenous varieties international varieties are abundant here….”  But the term internationalizing is a legitimizing and level setting word it is a far step backwards.  Backwards because it presupposes that the current term of “international wines” are just a limiting set.

Perhaps if that scope was expanded to include grapes like Sangiovese, Tempranillo, and Zinfandel.  Redefining and re-keying what is international will evolve and it is on our doorstep.  Simply because “international” is a hard word to understand or what is the intention.  The current view of this term will change to encompass a whole host of other varieties because the next definition will be something else.  That something else is hard to understand now but could be based on non-international wines to be planted in non-traditional places: Zinfandel in Chile, Tempranillo in Okanagan and Sangiovese in Mexico.

Or perhaps the term could flex to mean wines that encompass a broad range of food pairing possibilities.  Or perhaps have characteristics that span both the familiar and the exotic… or perhaps wines that journeying towards the expanse and newness of characteristics.

The term International wines will change and I for one believe it is important to encompass a broader meaning—simply because native or indigenous varieties need all the help in order to survive and to thrive. The term will broaden or perhaps will be less often used—it will be interesting to see either way.

¡Salud!

http://www.jamesthewineguy.com

***

Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time from all wine regions around the world.

Read more of my wine reviews:

© 2013 James Meléndez / Jaime Patricio Meléndez / James the Wine Guy— All Rights Reserved. James the Wine Guy also on Facebook, Twitter and most major social medias.

Follow, subscribe, like, browse: